Protests planned across US to back Apple in battle with FBI

February 21, 2016

Protesters are preparing to assemble in more than 30 cities to lash out at the FBI for obtaining a court order that requires Apple to make it easier to unlock an encrypted iPhone used by a gunman in December's mass shootings in Southern California.

The protests organized by the Internet rights group Fight for the Future are scheduled to occur Tuesday outside Apple stores in the U.S., the U.K., Hong Kong and Germany.

The U.S. protests will be in cities scattered across more than 20 states, including in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Washington, where protesters plan to express their discontent outside the FBI's headquarters.

The gatherings will come a week after the FBI went to court to force Apple to weaken the security built into most iPhones to help a terrorism investigation in San Bernardino, California. The FBI wants Apple to remove a feature that erases the information stored on an iPhone after 10 unsuccessful attempts to enter a password, preventing unauthorized users from accessing the device.

The iPhone that the FBI is trying to examine was used by Syed Farook, who along with his wife killed 14 people in December.

Apple is fighting the court order issued in the case, arguing that the special software sought by the FBI could be used to break into millions of other iPhones. The FBI contends Apple is exaggerating the security risks of complying with the in a marketing ploy aimed at selling more iPhones.

Fight for the Future believes Apple's concerns are warranted and is hoping the protests will persuade the Obama administration to take a stand against the way the FBI is trying to break into Farook's iPhone, said Evan Greer, the group's campaign director.

The White House so far has stood behind the FBI in its battle with Apple Inc.

Explore further: Apple ordered to hack San Bernardino shooter's iPhone

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BSD
not rated yet Feb 21, 2016
Apple - the terrorists first choice for mobile communications.
Phys1
not rated yet Feb 21, 2016
Of course the FBI first has to seize the phones and then has to subject each of them to a lengthy password cracking procedure. According to this
http://thehackern...ice.html
it may take up to 253 years or so to crack a phone.
It is at this point in time very unlikely that the FBI will unlock "millions of iphones" even if Apple complies. If the above information is correct they are lucky to crack even 1 iphone.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Feb 21, 2016
No matter how it turns out - at least we know know the extent of the FBI's crypto capabilities.

So if you want to be safe then you will have to reimplement security at the scale of current Apple devices (given that people who plan acts of terror are probably not really interested in sticking to laws that's a bit of a: Duh)...which I'm sure other devices can provide with a modicum of effort (if they don't already).

So they will win nothing by this save for:
- *maybe* getting information for this one case
- terminally weakening the sales model of any US based hardware/software companies abroad

This entire case is a lose-lose scenario for the FBI.
Phys1
not rated yet Feb 21, 2016
So far this has strengthened Apple's position. If the FBI has to to this trouble for every iphone then it will strengthen Apple's position even if the FBI wins this time.
gkam
1 / 5 (3) Feb 21, 2016
This is a game. The guvmunt can probably already open it, and probably has done so. They just want to set a precedent, so they can do what they want legally, instead of sneaking around like they do now.

Do not let them. I would have been on the side of government, it being all we have between us and the Bad Guys. But after serving 24 months as Deputy Foreperson on a Federal Criminal Grand Jury in the terrible Bush Years, I came to the conclusion THEY can be the Bad Guys.

I did electronic recon in the service, and found this: Mass illegal spying from broadband taps on the internet infrastructure, in Room 641A of the ATT Building in San Francisco.

They are already under your bed. They just want to be held harmless now when we catch them.
rderkis
1 / 5 (1) Feb 21, 2016
If we are not going to loose our sons, daughters, parents and others we love to terrorism, we must find a way to stop it. Stopping it or even slowing it down unfortunately means giving up some of our privacy and freedoms.

As a society, we seem to consider privacy and freedom one and the same, but are they? I really don't know.
If I was free to do and go anywhere I wanted (within the law) and was granted life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness but had absolutely no privacy would I be free?
gkam
1 / 5 (3) Feb 21, 2016
" and was granted life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness but had absolutely no privacy would I be free?"
-------------------------------

No. Someone with a dirty mind will think he has something on you, and that will be it. You'll be defending yourself forever.
antigoracle
1 / 5 (1) Feb 21, 2016
No. Someone with a dirty mind will think he has something on you, and that will be it. You'll be defending yourself forever.

Wow!! The mind of the Pathological Liar and how they rationalize their deceit.
gkam
1 / 5 (3) Feb 21, 2016
Not having anything to say regarding the topic, the trolls come out to make personal attacks.

When we worked with the federal agents on the Grand Jury, we found them to be personable and straight-forward. The decisions from above though, were seemingly petty, personal and political.

Somebody is still protecting the Bush Clan from what they did to us.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Feb 21, 2016
If we are not going to loose our sons, daughters, parents and others we love to terrorism, we must find a way to stop it. Stopping it or even slowing it down unfortunately means giving up some of our privacy and freedoms.

There are a number of countries out there that don't have a problem with terrorism and do not need to sacrifice any freedoms at all. Know why? Because they don't send their armies abroad to start grabbing other people's stuff.

The best defense against terrorism is: Don't create terrorists (and yes: all the terrorist that are haunting the world today are OUR OWN creations. Stick your nose in a history book once in a while and you will quickly figure this out)

And the best ways not to create terrorists is to play by the rules so as not to piss other people off.
rderkis
5 / 5 (1) Feb 21, 2016
Quote
antialias_physorg
"The best defense against terrorism is: Don't create terrorists (and yes: all the terrorist that are haunting the world today are OUR OWN creations. Stick your nose in a history book once in a while and you will quickly figure this out)"


A terrorist is just a bully.
So are you saying the Nazis of world war two would have left any countries alone that didn't meddle in their affairs?

True bullies don't need a reason for attacking someone, other that that they are different. Haven't you ever had a bully single you out just because your you? I am a geek who worked as a construction worker and have had bullies half my size attack me just because I was different. (didn't work out vary well for them :-)

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