Video: The unexpected chemistry of honey

January 12, 2016
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Honey is great. It's perfect for drizzling over your toast or stirring into your tea, it's also the special ingredient in your favorite lip balm. What most people don't know is that during the trip from the flower in the field to the jar on your table, honey spends an awful lot of time in a bee's gut.

This week, Reactions goes into the and explores how honey is made:

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Explore further: Honey as an antibiotic: Scientists identify a secret ingredient in honey that kills bacteria

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