New water soluble polymer for water resistant coatings

January 12, 2016
New water soluble polymer for water resistant coatings

A new polymer on the basis of a trick used by mussels has been developed by the Wageningen PhD student Juan Yang. The polymer should be able to let water-based paint flow better and produce water resistant coatings. Yang will defend her PhD-thesis on 12 January at Wageningen University.

Water-based is better for humans and the environment compared to paint with . Paint based on water, however, still does not carry the same properties as those based on chemicals. The paint flows differently than traditional alkyd systems for example. Giving a water-based product water-repellent characteristics is also no sinecure.

Mussel

Yang therefore has been looking for a polymer that dissolves in water but creates water resistance after application in her PhD research. She was inspired by the mussel. Being under water, a mussel can still attach itself to surfaces. The mussel does so by first excreting a thread of a specific type of protein from its foot. A reaction then occurs in these proteins, whereby the thread losses the ability to dissolve in water within a minute and becomes strong and tough. Much research already has been done on the chemistry of these proteins because of the adhesion properties, but not so much on the insolubility in water. Yang is unravelling this characteristic in her dissertation Mussel-inspired chemistry and its applications.

New water soluble polymer for water resistant coatings
A mussel-inspired copolymer forms P(DAA-co-AEMA) water resistant coating upon pH increase by self-crosslinking reaction of catechols and amines. Credit: Juan Yang et al, J. Mater. Chem. (2016)

Paint

The Wageningen PhD student was able to create a polymer with this property that reacts in water. One of the requirements for the toughening characteristic of this polymer is the de-acidification of its surroundings. This proof of principle offers a lead of departure for the paint industry to improve based paints. The effects of the polymer on other paint components, such as pigment and other properties, needs further research.

The reactive has the potency for application in other situations. For instance, mussel-inspired chemistry is suitable for the creation of antimicrobial coatings.

Explore further: Industry's first use of water-based paint for plastic chassis ICT equipment

More information: Juan Yang et al. A clear coat from a water soluble precursor: a bioinspired paint concept, J. Mater. Chem. A (2016). DOI: 10.1039/C5TA09437B

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Isolation of Fe(IV) decamethylferrocene salts

August 29, 2016

(Phys.org)—Ferrocene is the model compound that students often learn when they are introduced to organometallic chemistry. It has an iron center that is coordinated to the π electrons in two cyclopentadienyl rings. (C5H5- ...

Bringing artificial enzymes closer to nature

August 29, 2016

Scientists at the University of Basel, ETH Zurich, and NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering have developed an artificial metalloenzyme that catalyses a reaction inside of cells without equivalent in nature. This could be a ...

New method developed for producing some metals

August 25, 2016

The MIT researchers were trying to develop a new battery, but it didn't work out that way. Instead, thanks to an unexpected finding in their lab tests, what they discovered was a whole new way of producing the metal antimony—and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.