Motorhead fans want new heavy metal to be called 'Lemmium'

January 6, 2016
British rock band Motorhead's lead singer Ian "Lemmy" Kilmister performs on June 26, 2015
British rock band Motorhead's lead singer Ian "Lemmy" Kilmister performs on June 26, 2015

A petition calling for a new heavy metal element in the periodic table to be named after the late Motorhead frontman Lemmy had drawn more than 30,000 signatures Wednesday.

It calls for one of four newly-discovered heavy metals to be called "Lemmium" in honour of the hard rock legend, real name Ian Kilmister, who died of cancer aged 70 last month.

"Lemmy was a force of nature and the very essence of ," the petition on the website said.

"We believe it is fitting that the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry recommend that one of the four new discovered heavy metals in the periodic table is named Lemmium."

The IUPAC is the body responsible for naming new elements in the .

The campaign has drawn support from musicians including Duff McKagan, bass player for Guns N'Roses, and Charlatans singer Tim Burgess.

It was launched by fan John Wright, who told Sky News television the move would be appropriate because Lemmy was a "force of nature and the very essence of heavy metal".

Ironically, though, Lemmy always rejected that label for his group, insisting they were a rock and roll band.

He told The Independent newspaper in 2010: "Everyone always describes us as heavy metal even when I tell them otherwise. Why won't people listen?"

Motorhead, whose hard-and-fast hits included "Ace of Spades", were reputed to be the loudest band in the world, while Lemmy was synonymous with rock and roll excess, drinking a bottle of whiskey a day.

Explore further: Japan team to name element 113 in Asian first (Update)

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