Video: The chemistry of hangovers

December 29, 2015
Credit: The American Chemical Society

It's almost New Year's Eve, and many will be ringing in 2016 with champagne, wine, beer and cocktails. But for those who overindulge, the next day is accompanied by another tradition: the New Year's Day hangover.

In this episode of Reactions, we look at the chemistry behind the lousy effects of a and offer some tips to limit its symptoms.

Check it out here and impress your friends this new year:

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Explore further: Video: The chemistry of wine

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