Trans-Neptunian objects suggest that there are more planets in the solar system

January 15, 2015
At least two unknown planets could exist in our solar system beyond Pluto. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

There could be at least two unknown planets hidden well beyond Pluto, whose gravitational influence determines the orbits and strange distribution of objects observed beyond Neptune. This has been revealed by numerical calculations made by researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Cambridge. If confirmed, this hypothesis would revolutionise solar system models.

Astronomers have spent decades debating whether some dark trans-Plutonian planet remains to be discovered within the . According to the calculations of scientists at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM, Spain) and the University of Cambridge (United Kingdom) not only one, but at least two planets must exist to explain the orbital behaviour of extreme trans-Neptunian objects (ETNO).

The most accepted theory establishes that the orbits of these objects, which travel beyond Neptune, should be distributed randomly, and by an observational bias, their paths must fulfil a series of characteristics: have a semi-major axis with a value close to 150 AU (astronomical units or times the distance between the Earth and the Sun), an inclination of almost 0° and an argument or angle of perihelion (closest point of the orbit to our Sun) also close to 0° or 180°.

Yet what is observed in a dozen of these bodies is quite different: the values of the semi-major axis are very disperse (between 150 AU and 525 AU), the average inclination of their orbit is around 20° and argument of Perihelion -31°, without appearing in any case close to 180°.

"This excess of objects with unexpected orbital parameters makes us believe that some invisible forces are altering the distribution of the orbital elements of the ETNO and we consider that the most probable explanation is that other unknown planets exist beyond Neptune and Pluto," explains Carlos de la Fuente Marcos, scientist at the UCM and co-author of the study.
"The exact number is uncertain, given that the data that we have is limited, but our calculations suggest that there are at least two planets, and probably more, within the confines of our solar system," adds the astrophysicist.

To carry out the study, which is published as two articles in the journal 'Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters', the researchers have analysed the effects of the so-called 'Kozai mechanism', related to the gravitational perturbation that a large body exerts on the orbit of another much smaller and further away object. As a reference they have considered how this mechanism works in the case of comet 96P/Machholz1 under the influence of Jupiter.

Two problems to solve

Despite their surprising results, the authors recognise that their data comes up against two problems. On the one hand, their proposal goes against the predictions of current models on the formation of the solar system, which state that there are no other planets moving in circular orbits beyond Neptune.

However, the recent discovery by the ALMA radio telescope of a planet-forming disk more than 100 astronomical units from the star HL Tauri, which is younger than the Sun and more massive, suggests that planets can form several hundred astronomical units away from the centre of the system.

On the other hand, the team recognises that the analysis is based on a sample with few objects (specifically 13), but they point out that in the coming months more results are going to be published, making the sample larger. "If it is confirmed, our results may be truly revolutionary for astronomy," says de la Fuente Marcos.

Last year two researchers from the United States discovered a dwarf planet called 2012 VP113 in the Oort cloud, just beyond our solar system. The discoverers consider that its orbit is influenced by the possible presence of a dark and icy super-Earth, up to ten times larger than our planet.

Explore further: Neptune on tiptoes

More information: Carlos de la Fuente Marcos, Raúl de la Fuente Marcos, Sverre J. Aarseth. "Flipping minor bodies: what comet 96P/Machholz 1 can tell us about the orbital evolution of extreme trans-Neptunian objects and the production of near-Earth objects on retrograde orbits". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 446(2):1867-1873, 2015.

C. de la Fuente Marcos, R. de la Fuente Marcos. "Extreme trans-Neptunian objects and the Kozai mechanism: signalling the presence of trans-Plutonian planets? Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters 443(1): L59-L63, 2014.

Related Stories

Neptune on tiptoes

March 14, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- The formation and development of the solar system, long a topic of study for philosophers and scientists, is today often used as a case study for the formation and development of planetary systems around ...

Three centaurs follow Uranus through the solar system

June 18, 2013

Astrophysicists from the Complutense University of Madrid have confirmed that Crantor, a large asteroid with a diameter of 70 km has an orbit similar to that of Uranus and takes the same amount of time to orbit the Sun. Researchers ...

'Hot Jupiters' provoke their own host suns to wobble

September 11, 2014

Blame the "hot Jupiters." These large, gaseous exoplanets (planets outside our solar system) can make their suns wobble when they wend their way through their own solar systems to snuggle up against their suns, according ...

Recommended for you

Team discovers moon over Makemake in the Kuiper Belt

June 27, 2016

A Southwest Research Institute-led team has discovered an elusive, dark moon orbiting Makemake, one of the "big four" dwarf planets populating the Kuiper Belt region at the edge of our solar system. The findings are detailed ...

Researchers trace Mercury's origins to rare meteorite

June 27, 2016

Around 4.6 billion years ago, the Solar System was a chaos of collapsing gas and spinning debris. Small particles of gas and dust clumped together into larger and more massive meteoroids that in turn smashed together to form ...

ChemCam findings hint at oxygen-rich past on Mars

June 27, 2016

The discovery of manganese oxides in Martian rocks might tell us that the Red Planet was once more Earth-like than previously believed. A new paper in Geophysical Research Letters reveals that NASA's Curiosity rover observed ...

50 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

jefferey_burnside
2.5 / 5 (4) Jan 15, 2015
Growing up there was 9 and then they took one away and yet now they say there are more??? Hmmm how many planets are in our solar system? just when you thought you knew you found out that you had no idea
Shootist
not rated yet Jan 15, 2015
And last week we were told that Eris was the largest trans-Neptunian we'd ever find.

http://phys.org/n...elt.html
Uncle Ira
4 / 5 (13) Jan 15, 2015
Growing up there was 9 and then they took one away and yet now they say there are more??? Hmmm how many planets are in our solar system? just when you thought you knew you found out that you had no idea


Well three hundred years ago they had no idea there was more then the just the first six. So jeffery-Skippy that is just the way the science stuffs work. Learning new stuff and adjusting the not new stuffs as you move alone.

Sorry Cher, but I guess you'll just have to get used to having idea.
Uncle Ira
4.2 / 5 (10) Jan 15, 2015
And last week we were told that Eris was the largest trans-Neptunian we'd ever find.

http://phys.org/n...elt.html


Yeah, that's what we were told Skippy. I'm glad you caught that. And guess what Cher? He is still the largest this week. If they found one bigger that is what the article would be about. They seem to be LOOKING for something bigger, not found something bigger.
Caliban
5 / 5 (6) Jan 15, 2015
Yeah, if you check the "Related Stories" following the article, you'll encounter this:

http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv

Which, I think, is the story j_burnside is referring to. Note that it also contains conclusions by the researcher that the presence of this object in its current orbit pretty much depends upon the existence of at least two, much larger, objects outside the orbit of Pluto.

Not new news, after all --but still mighty intriguing, yes?

Anakin
4.4 / 5 (7) Jan 15, 2015
@Shootist
Thats not what we are told.
"Furthermore, Dr. Brown maintains that there is a good likelihood that a Mars or Earth-sized object exists in the Oort Cloud.

Read more at: http://phys.org/n...tml#jCp"
xsci
1.2 / 5 (9) Jan 15, 2015
Welcome to the new world of pop science. The 'hypothesis' was put forth after studying 13 objects! Clearly this is an attempt by the Marcos brothers to resurrect planet X by first coming up with a conjecture about planets beyond Pluto and then trying to find some objects to support their conjecture. That is not the Scientific Method yet it somehow passes in todays scientific community. Why is it that the Marcos brothers fail to mention the prevailing hypothesis - which is widely accepted - that it was a passing star's gravity which not only disturbed the Kuiper belt objects but was also responsible for the Late Heavy Bombardment? Yet it is pop science which grabs the headlines and the attention span of the younger less educated readers still clinging onto their fantasies of Zecharia Sitchin and 2012. Next up: a scientific 'hypothesis' about how ancient aliens created the Bermuda Triangle.
Maggnus
5 / 5 (10) Jan 15, 2015
And last week we were told that Eris was the largest trans-Neptunian we'd ever find.

http://phys.org/n...elt.html


But what does Freeman Dyson say? Did you check to see if he thinks there may be other trans-Neptunian objects?

"Freeman Dyson has proposed that Trans-Neptunian Objects, rather than planets, are the major potential habitat of life in space."

But Freeman Dyson says there must be millions, nay billions of such objects, and if Freemen says it, then you know it must be true, because Freeman is much smarter than you.
Caliban
5 / 5 (10) Jan 15, 2015
Welcome to the new world of pop science. The 'hypothesis' was put forth after studying 13 objects! Clearly this is an attempt by the Marcos brothers to resurrect planet X by first coming up with a conjecture about planets beyond Pluto and then trying to find some objects to support their conjecture. That is not the Scientific Method yet it somehow passes in todays scientific community. Why is it that the Marcos brothers fail to [...] Zecharia Sitchin and 2012. Next up: a scientific 'hypothesis' about how ancient aliens created the Bermuda Triangle.


Here it is again: http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv

You say no, but these scientists, and others, say that they are likely at least, if not certainly necessary to produce the distribution and orbital charateristics of the so far discovered trans Neptune objects.

It's fine for you to voice your opinion, but if you are going to make an assertion of fact, then please link your irrefutible counterresearch.
ulao
4.8 / 5 (6) Jan 15, 2015
Is this not similar to what made Clyde Tombaugh stumble onto Pluto?
mooster75
4.6 / 5 (10) Jan 16, 2015
And last week we were told that Eris was the largest trans-Neptunian we'd ever find.

http://phys.org/n...elt.html


But what does Freeman Dyson say? Did you check to see if he thinks there may be other trans-Neptunian objects?

"Freeman Dyson has proposed that Trans-Neptunian Objects, rather than planets, are the major potential habitat of life in space."

But Freeman Dyson says there must be millions, nay billions of such objects, and if Freemen says it, then you know it must be true, because Freeman is much smarter than you.

"The Trans-Neptunian Objects will be fine."
Mimath224
4.8 / 5 (4) Jan 16, 2015
So Voyager 1 might not be out of the SS yet eh?
PhotonX
4.7 / 5 (7) Jan 16, 2015
@Shootist
Thats not what we are told.
"Furthermore, Dr. Brown maintains that there is a good likelihood that a Mars or Earth-sized object exists in the Oort Cloud.

Read more at: http://phys.org/n...tml#jCp"
Apparently Shootist can't tell the difference between big and bright.
PhotonX
5 / 5 (7) Jan 16, 2015
So Voyager 1 might not be out of the SS yet eh?
Agreed: I've always thought of the solar system as being the gravitational domain of the Sun, and not simply the area within the heliosphere, which is what the big Voyager 1 hullabaloo was about. But, since modern civilization will be long gone by the time the deep space probes leave the gravitational domain, we have to make hay while the Sun shines, so to speak, and celebrate when we can, so the party happened during the heliopause crossing..
mop6758
1 / 5 (12) Jan 16, 2015
Ancient peoples claim that our sun has a binary sister, the star sirius, and that every 24,000 years, our sun orbits around that star making a great year.

Taking this into account, our solar system must span to the star sirius, and include its planets and everything in between.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (11) Jan 16, 2015
Ancient peoples claim that our sun has a binary sister, the star sirius, and that every 24,000 years, our sun orbits around that star making a great year.

Taking this into account, our solar system must span to the star sirius, and include its planets and everything in between.

Ancient people didn't have science. Sirius would either have to be much closer, or have a much longer orbit.
Maggnus
5 / 5 (8) Jan 16, 2015
Ancient peoples claim that our sun has a binary sister, the star sirius, and that every 24,000 years, our sun orbits around that star making a great year.

Taking this into account, our solar system must span to the star sirius, and include its planets and everything in between.


Ancient peoples were wrong. As for Sirius, read this: http://www.space....tar.html
Uncle Ira
4.1 / 5 (9) Jan 16, 2015
Ancient peoples claim that our sun has a binary sister, the star sirius, and that every 24,000 years, our sun orbits around that star making a great year.


How you are Mop-Skippy? I'm real good thanks. Now I really do wish I could take the credit for what I'm about to tell you. That's why it's taking me so long to get back to you because I had to get the help.

I was thinking that if we zipped around the Sirius going that fast, the numbers and distances might make that a silly notion, you following me? Good. So without a lot of gobbledygook, this is what the nice-Skippette down at the library told me about that.

Sirius is 8.3 ly away from us here. That's really far in miles. But 24,000 years for the orbit would have us zipping along at along at 405 miles per second. She told me that is faster than the escaping speed for that far away.

I'll have to P.S. you with the rest I'm running out of letters.
Uncle Ira
4 / 5 (8) Jan 16, 2015
P.S. for you mop-Skippy with the rest of what I wanted to say about it. Okayeei?

She told me that finding out escaping speed was easy to cipher once you know the size of the things and how far apart they are. And if you know has long it takes to go round that has to match up with distance because of a physics rule or law maybe.

Only part I think she got wrong is the part about it being really easy to figure out. Not for me it wasn't but after Mrs-Ira-Skippette explained what was going on, then I understood that the nice Skippette at the library was probably right I think.
Nik_2213
5 / 5 (7) Jan 16, 2015
Our Sun & Sirius orbit each other ? Tad tricky, as Sirius is in the chemically distinctive, young-ish 'Sirius Moving Group' aka Sirius Super Cluster or Ursa Major star stream, and we're not...

{Sets yet another ditzy user to 'ignore'...}
Mimath224
5 / 5 (5) Jan 16, 2015
@Uncle Ira, yes I think Mop is getting confused with another issue. I can't remember what ancient tribe in Africa it was but apparently some author wrote that they worshipped, then a companion star (now,Sirius B) when at that time they couldn't see it. I think similar claims have been made about the stars of Orion and the megaliths at Nabta Playa.
Uncle Ira
4.5 / 5 (8) Jan 16, 2015
@Uncle Ira, yes I think Mop is getting confused with another issue. I can't remember what ancient tribe in Africa it was but apparently some author wrote that they worshipped, then a companion star (now,Sirius B) when at that time they couldn't see it. I think similar claims have been made about the stars of Orion and the megaliths at Nabta Playa.


Yeah maybe that is it he is confused. Speaking of confused, you should have heard me talking to the nice Skippette at the library on the phone. I think at first she thought I was having fun with her. But after she got unconfused at what I was trying to ask her, she was able to unconfuse me about the question I had and get me the answer pretty quick.
Whydening Gyre
3.6 / 5 (5) Jan 16, 2015
Not that I would actually know how to decipher the angles and such, but perhaps Sirius APPEARs to rotate around the sun every 24000 years. Perhaps, due to a number of things, just one of such being Earth's (Milankovitch) wobble...
OZGuy
5 / 5 (9) Jan 17, 2015
WG

Get onto RealityCheck for the physics and Benni for the mathematics. Those guys are the resident "geniuses" and if they can't sort it we are truly stuffed.

RC may be busy defining the Periodic Table of Elements or some other such trivial thing given the ToE/GUT/ToSS/ASS is yet again on the back burner. Appears the GW solution is on hold too so he should be available if you genuflect appropriately. (He really needs to release the equivalent of a Bat Light so he can respond to UN scientific emergencies quickly)

Seems science needs a LOT of corrections, thankfully the Reality Cavalry is here to rescue us from sloth and ignorance.
OZGuy
5 / 5 (10) Jan 17, 2015
Ira
You performed fact checking, obtained and cited the information sources and didn't take credit for the work of others. That's a lot more than quite a few posters on here can seemingly do, maybe you could hold classes and point them in the right direction.
PhotonX
5 / 5 (8) Jan 17, 2015
Ancient peoples claim that our sun has a binary sister, the star [Sirius], and that every 24,000 years, our sun orbits around that star making a great year.

Taking this into account, our solar system must span to the star [Sirius], and include its planets and everything in between.
Mop, after seeing the above responses to what really was an absurd assertion, maybe you'll do some fact checking in the future before repeating on a hard science site what you've heard on the History Channel or YouTube or wherever it was that you got that. The first thing you should have asked yourself was how the ancients could possibly have known that, given that they didn't even have written records, nevermind modern science. I'm not trying to beat you up, just recommending a bit of caution.

@Uncle Ira: Maybe if you left out all the Skippies, you wouldn't run out of characters so often. :-)
HannesAlfven
1.2 / 5 (5) Jan 17, 2015
Re: "The first thing you should have asked yourself was how the ancients could possibly have known that, given that they didn't even have written records, nevermind modern science. I'm not trying to beat you up, just recommending a bit of caution."

Velikovsky was not the greatest scientist, but he was extremely well read in terms of historical documents, and one of the most interesting points that emerges from all of the debate he inspired is this fact that a red substance might have at one point rained down upon the Earth, and that it might have coincided with some very intense events.

Given that one of our two nearest planetary neighbors is obviously rather red, there is all sorts of potential to explain such events as some sort of planetary disruption.

People who discount V seem to skip over the bit about his challenge to the King Tut radiocarbon dates. He forced a re-dating, and the re-dating corresponded to his own historical account.
Uncle Ira
4.4 / 5 (8) Jan 17, 2015
@Uncle Ira: Maybe if you left out all the Skippies, you wouldn't run out of characters so often. :-)


Mrs-Ira-Skippette tells that to me all the time too. I just can't help my self.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (7) Jan 17, 2015
@Uncle Ira: Maybe if you left out all the Skippies, you wouldn't run out of characters so often. :-)

Okay... No offense, Ira, but THAT was funny...:-)
Mimath224
5 / 5 (2) Jan 17, 2015
@PhotonX etc. I moved recently but I've managed to dig out a book that refers to my earlier post. The Origin map by T.G.Brophy, Ph.D. There is quite a bit of data in there about the megaliths at Nabta Playa. I have never been there but if the photos in that book are anything to go by I wonder how he managed his research. Ancient sites are all to often, damaged, shifted etc. Dates inplied there go back beyond the Sumerians and it seems that later cultures (Egypt 2400BC) may not have known the reason for pre- ancient structures but still held them as being important. This system mostly revolves around the stars Betelgeuse, Bellatrix, Mintaka etc. Other books about European megaliths infer celestial design maps by interpretation of position, 'cup marks' etc. Some suggest the SS is much larger than we realise. cont...
Mimath224
5 / 5 (1) Jan 17, 2015
I am not saying I agree with all of this but they do make interesting reading. Makes one wonder why ancients went to all that trouble...but then the ancients didn't worry about rushing home to watch their favourite 'Soap' etc. I have often thought that it might have been some kind of 'social competition', especially those of Europe where apparently some structures took a hundred years or more to build. Without a written language how were these planned and handed down...mmmm?
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (3) Jan 18, 2015
I am not saying I agree with all of this but they do make interesting reading. Makes one wonder why ancients went to all that trouble?

To tell us how the universe counts and uses numbers...
Without a written language how were these planned and handed down...mmmm?


Without written language, it was the only way they knew - verbally...
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2015
Without a written language how were these planned and handed down...mmmm?

Without written language, it was the only way they knew - verbally...

Sadly, written language leaves much to be desired with respect to depth, context and nuance as opposed to spoken communication.
And - we keep having to make up MORE words to try and fill in the blanks...
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (4) Jan 18, 2015
Growing up there was 9 and then they took one away and yet now they say there are more???

Just goes to show that learning by rote without understanding the subject is useless.
bluehigh
1 / 5 (3) Jan 18, 2015
Stars are not so far way. The em and gravitational effects of stars distort the observed positions. In our case the Sun makes other stars seem more distant. Think concave lens.
Uncle Ira
4.3 / 5 (6) Jan 18, 2015
Stars are not so far way. The em and gravitational effects of stars distort the observed positions. In our case the Sun makes other stars seem more distant. Think concave lens.


Alright I did that. I thought about the concave lenses. But it didn't help none. It sounds like a silly notion to me. Maybe later I will think some more concave lenses and see what happen after some more thinking about it.

If I do find some time to think more, do I have to think about the stars next to the sun or will even the stars in the other direction work? Because looking near the sun hurts my eyes I mean.
Mimath224
4 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, yes I understand what you mean but that means there was little change in the verbal planning over many years and I don't think thats the norm. However, when religion is involved,worship the Sun etc. I suppose change would be less likely. I don't know if you have visited any of such sites but those I have seen are very impressive especially those unerground where the stars etc cannot be seen and apparently are not simple copies of those above ground.
katesisco
1 / 5 (4) Jan 18, 2015
Well, I am looking forward to a version of xsci's Planet X only I suspect Proxima Centauri. Perhaps a companion of our sun forced into a very long elliptical out to Centauri A & B and back to Sol. And if this is a small bh degrading by losing energy into a stellar body, perhaps the Ancients would have been aware. Reading P Ward Out Of Thin Air, and something affected our planet, producing O2 highs. And toxic gas highs. Would a stellar body on a long elliptical entering the Oort shell affect Sol's emissions?
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (4) Jan 18, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, yes I understand what you mean but that means there was little change in the verbal planning over many years and I don't think thats the norm. However, when religion is involved, worship the Sun etc. I suppose change would be less likely.

They had fewer things to distract them. A LOT less...
Ritual aids in memory retention and a ritualized method of "remembering" info interesting to all could, over a period of time, be construed as religious. (That, of course, did not go unnoticed by those who wished a higher level of control within the "tribe" for themselves, for whatever reason...)
These guys were not dumb, by any means. They just hadn't created enough distractions - yet - to skew their focus.
movementiseternal
Jan 18, 2015
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (7) Jan 19, 2015
Stars are not so far way. The em and gravitational effects of stars distort the observed positions. In our case the Sun makes other stars seem more distant. Think concave lens.

So... you think the thousands of people working on developing these measurements are too stupid to have taken em and gravity into account?
OZGuy
5 / 5 (5) Jan 19, 2015
movemengtiseternal
EternalBS
mooster75
4 / 5 (4) Jan 19, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, yes I understand what you mean but that means there was little change in the verbal planning over many years and I don't think thats the norm.

That's not the norm now, but in pre-literate societies, memory is a much stronger tool. When it was replaced by writing, it weakened. And, it seems to be growing even weaker today with wide-spread computer storage. It won't be long before people will read about how memory was used in the mid-twentieth century and scoff.
mooster75
4.2 / 5 (5) Jan 19, 2015
movemengtiseternal
EternalBS

And yet his posts do actually seem to be eternal recycling...
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (2) Jan 19, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, yes I understand what you mean but that means there was little change in the verbal planning over many years and I don't think thats the norm.

That's not the norm now, but in pre-literate societies, memory is a much stronger tool. When it was replaced by writing, it weakened. And, it seems to be growing even weaker today with wide-spread computer storage. It won't be long before people will read about how memory was used in the mid-twentieth century and scoff.

It's the old "use it or lose it" syndrome...
Mimath224
5 / 5 (2) Jan 19, 2015
I've done a back of an envelope scribble with a variation of Bodes Law (don't laugh, it's just for fun) and the modification involes the number 1536 (which is the determinant of a non-astro matrix I'm working. Using Wiki sheet for said law, my figures for Neptune and Pluto are 30.36 AU & 39.8 AU. Not accurate I know but more so than BL. Based on this bit of fun I get 163.9 AU for the next. Anyone like to join me? No, oh well...guess I'll get plenty of 1/5 votes
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (3) Jan 19, 2015
I've done a back of an envelope scribble with a variation of Bodes Law (don't laugh, it's just for fun) and the modification involes the number 1536 (which is the determinant of a non-astro matrix I'm working. Using Wiki sheet for said law, my figures for Neptune and Pluto are 30.36 AU & 39.8 AU. Not accurate I know but more so than BL. Based on this bit of fun I get 163.9 AU for the next. Anyone like to join me? No, oh well...guess I'll get plenty of 1/5 votes

I did my own calculations a couple years ago and found that, generally, all the major planetary bodies followed the 1 and 2/3's rule (Fibonacci, Golden Ratio, etc).
Prob'ly not as precise, but a decent rule of thumb...
Mimath224
5 / 5 (2) Jan 19, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, yes I've done a bit with Fibonacci & Lucas numbers and it's surprising how many natural events seem to follow this type of trend. But then as 4/pi is equal to the sqrt of 1.62113....and pi is connected to many things, including orbits, then maybe it isn't that surprising after all. Found it (approximately) in our 365.256 siderial year too.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (3) Jan 19, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, yes I've done a bit with Fibonacci & Lucas numbers and it's surprising how many natural events seem to follow this type of trend. But then as 4/pi is equal to the sqrt of 1.62113....and pi is connected to many things, including orbits, then maybe it isn't that surprising after all. Found it (approximately) in our 365.256 siderial year too.

Nature's math leaves some wiggle room...
Mimath224
5 / 5 (1) Jan 20, 2015
@Whydening Gyre, Ha, agreed.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.