Solutions for an Internet of energy

September 25, 2014
The intelligent power grid of tomorrow, the so-called Smart Grid, ensures that energy from renewable energy sources is extensively integrated in private households. Electric cars can be recharged overnight with off-peak energy generated by wind power.

In the EU-funded Artemis research project, Siemens has developed solutions for a future "Internet of Energy." This Internet of Energy is defined as the networking of relatively autonomous electricity producers and consumers, who determine and cover the energy demand among themselves. Such an infrastructure will become necessary when large numbers of electric vehicles have to be supplied with energy in the future. Siemens has, among other things, developed technologies that integrate electric vehicles into the energy management systems of large buildings. The results are being presented at the European Conference on Nanoelectronics and Embedded Systems for Electric Mobility ecoCity eMotion in Erlangen from September 22-26.

Like other energy consumers and small producers, electric cars still operate in a completely uncoordinated manner, feeding energy into the grid at random times and tapping electricity in a similarly arbitrary manner. If their numbers continue to increase, their energy demand and the energy they can supply will have to be planned in advance in order to keep the grid stable. According to experts, the solution is to create an Internet of Energy that would largely allow consumers and producers to coordinate supply and demand autonomously among themselves. An Internet of Energy would be equipped with smart forecasting systems that would use weather forecasts, traffic expectations and other information to predict future .

Within the framework of Artemis, Siemens is developing solutions that enable large numbers of small producers to coordinate power generation more or less on their own while maintaining grid stability. The grid is connected to the Internet through secure, seamless interfaces so that the electric vehicles' energy needs can be coordinated with the supply. In the development of this system, the electric vehicles also serve as a model for other decentralized energy consumers and suppliers. Basically, the aim is to combine the infrastructure - and therefore also the power grid - with the Internet in order to fully control the flow of energy. The necessary information is provided by a range of different systems, including power flow sensors that will be installed at a large number of points throughout the distribution network, even on its medium-voltage lines. Siemens is also developing highly efficient power electronics for charging stations and other systems. In combination with fast energy storage devices, these electronics will ensure optimum grid stability.

During the conference, Siemens is demonstrating its latest developments for the Internet of Energy at its research facility. It is showing how various smart charging stations for alternating and direct current can be integrated into the energy management system of a large functional building. The system regulates and controls the flows of energy and loads within the building. In addition, simulations show how the manager can incorporate the current traffic situation - in this case information about the - into its forecasts.

Explore further: Smart software for self-regulating smart grid

Related Stories

Smart software for self-regulating smart grid

May 24, 2011

Siemens and the utility company Allgauer Uberlandwerk (AUW) in the city of Kempten, Germany, are testing the smart grids of the future. The tests focus on optimized power distribution and the use of a self-organizing energy ...

Energy management in the cloud

April 4, 2014

Siemens is enabling smaller municipal utility companies to market energy from renewable sources through the cloud. The solution's main element is a cloud-based energy management system that combines distributed electricity ...

A plug fit for every car

July 4, 2014

If you can't find a charging cable for your cell phone, it's an inconvenience. But what if you're away from home and can't find a charging station compatible with your electric vehicle?

Economical and agile offshore construction ship

July 25, 2014

Siemens is currently installing the power supply and propulsion systems into a new multi-purpose offshore construction ship for Toisa Ltd. The ship, which is being built by the Korean company Hyundai Heavy Industries Ltd., ...

Cable-free charging of electric cars via coils

April 11, 2011

In the future, motorists will no longer need a cable to recharge the batteries of their electric cars, thanks to a development project for inductive charging, which Siemens presented at Hannover Messe 2011. Developed in cooperation ...

Energy to power tomorrow's electric vehicles

September 9, 2013

Sales of full electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles have been rising steadily in many parts of the world, including Europe. These are motor vehicles, including personal cars, which can be recharged from an external ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft aims at Apple with high-end PCs, 3D software

October 26, 2016

Microsoft launched a new consumer offensive Wednesday, unveiling a high-end computer that challenges the Apple iMac along with an updated Windows operating system that showcases three-dimensional content and "mixed reality."

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

1 / 5 (1) Sep 25, 2014
Some peaking powerplants have already been replaced with PV, and some baseload by wind.

The Distributed power system is becoming a reality, but there is much work to do in security.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.