Cloud forests struggle to keep pace with climate change

Sep 01, 2014 by Evelyn Perez
Biology researcher Evan Rehm has studied the tropical cloud forests of Manú National Park (Peru) for three years.

The cloud forests of the Andes Mountains are not migrating fast enough in the face of global warming, according to FIU researchers.

Plant and animal species are migrating upslope throughout the tropics to mitigate the effects of increasing global temperatures. But the cloud forests, with their signature cloud and mist cover along the rainforest canopy, are not keeping pace.

Evan Rhem, a biological sciences Ph.D. student and researcher at Fairchild Tropical Botanical Gardens, has spent three years in Manú National Park (Peru) studying how the region's tropical will adapt to climate change. The delicate and interconnected ecosystem comprises less than 1 percent of all the world's forests, but is among the most biologically diverse and ecologically important places on Earth.

By using homemade seed traps made of PVC piping, netting and other materials, the team of researchers examined seedling recruitment patterns, seed dispersal and microclimate at the timberline, or the edge of a habitat at which trees are capable of growing. They also looked at the puna, which is the high elevation grasslands above the forest. Their results indicated any upslope migration of the timberline into the puna will likely occur at a rate that is slower than what is required to keep pace with warming.

"Slowed forest expansion into the puna could act as a barrier to the upslope migration of Andean cloud forest species leading to extreme losses of Andean biodiversity," Rehm said. "If the Andean timberlines continue to remain fixed despite future climate change, this could have dire consequences to global biodiversity."

The study, coauthored with FIU biology professor Kenneth Feeley, was published in Forest Ecology and Management.

Explore further: Study: World's primary forests on the brink, study says

More information: Evan M. Rehm, Kenneth J. Feeley, "Forest patches and the upward migration of timberline in the southern Peruvian Andes," Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 305, 1 October 2013, Pages 204-211, ISSN 0378-1127, dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.05.041.

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mememine69
1.5 / 5 (8) Sep 01, 2014
Climate science journalism was a lazy copy and paste news editor's dream come true.

Is science also only 95% certain the planet isn't flat as well as being their; "95%" certain that Human CO2 "could" flatten it? If it were a crisis they would have said so after 32 years of "could be" warnings and a mob of you remaining determined goose stepping "believers" do not get to determine certainty for science's; "THREAT TO THE PLANET" to billions of innocent children. Climate blame exaggeration has done to the left what Bush and his false wars did for the neocons.

It wasn't a crime for science to say "could be" forever but it is a crime for you eager "believers" to tell our children that science "believes" as much as you so enthusiasticly do.

Move on;
*Occupywallstreet now does not even mention CO2 in its list of demands because of the bank-funded and corporate run carbon trading stock markets ruled by politicians.
*Canada killed Y2Kyoto 2 years ago with a freely elected climate change denying prime minister and nobody cared, especially the millions of scientists warning us of unstoppable warming (a comet hit).
Shootist
1.5 / 5 (8) Sep 01, 2014
For 200 Million Years

Cloud forests struggle to keep pace with climate change


"Generally speaking, I'm much more of a conformist, but it happens I have strong views about climate because I think the majority is badly wrong, and you have to make sure if the majority is saying something that they're not talking nonsense." - Freeman Dyson

"What I'm convinced of is that we don't understand climate." - Freeman Dyson

As a general rule, if Freeman Dyson doesn't understand something, you don't, either. And yes, I am talking to you.

"The polar bears will be fine". - Freeman Dyson
Caliban
5 / 5 (5) Sep 01, 2014
For 200 Million Years

"Generally speaking, I'm much more of a conformist, but it happens I have strong views about climate because I think the majority is badly wrong, and you have to make sure if the majority is saying something that they're not talking nonsense." - Freeman Dyson

"What I'm convinced of is that we don't understand climate." - Freeman Dyson

As a general rule, if Freeman Dyson doesn't understand something, you don't, either. And yes, I am talking to you, Freeman Dyson

"The polar bears will be fine". - Freeman Dyson


Hey shooty-

It certainly seems as though you've been reposting this tired, old, fossilized boilerplate canard for 200 million years.

You need some new material.

Or not. More likely, you need to retire, and hopefully will then quietly "shuffle off to Buffalo" never to whimper anon.

Moron.

strangedays
5 / 5 (3) Sep 01, 2014
Dyson also believes in E.S.P. - and has proven that he is very capable of getting things very wrong - when speaking outside of his area of expertise.

http://recursed.b...son.html