Vet's warning over waking snakes

August 26, 2014 by Jo Manning
Vet's warning over waking snakes
Venomous snakes like dugites are emerging from hibernation. Credit: Ann Storrie, Department of Parks and Wildlife

Early spring-like weather is attracting venomous snakes out of hibernation, pet owners are being warned.

As they are still sluggish this time of year, they are more likely to bite if cornered or harassed by a dog or cat rather than slither away.

Dr Jill Griffiths of the Murdoch Pet Emergency Centre (MPEC) said owners should be on the lookout for snakes and be aware of symptoms and emergency responses.

"Snake bites are relatively common summertime emergencies that can be fatal. Factors such as the number of times your pet is bitten, how long it has been since the snake last fed and how long it takes before you seek medical attention really dictate how severe your pet's reaction will be," Dr Griffiths said.

"We encourage anyone who suspects their pet has come into contact with a snake to take them to a veterinarian immediately. In most cases, bites are difficult to detect and don't show overt swelling or bleeding."

Dr Griffiths said the most immediate reactions to a bite were trembling, rapid breathing, vomiting, defecation, and/or collapse. Following this, animals may appear to recover, but then the pupils may dilate and the animal's gait will become clumsy as the legs become progressively weaker.

If the dose of venom is large enough, complete paralysis will occur followed by death if untreated with anti-venom.

"If treated immediately, pets have a very good chance of survival and recovery. The best course of action is to keep your as calm and still as possible and get them to help," Dr Griffiths said. "We recommend that you do not take a "wait and see" approach to snakebite.

"In more severe cases, we've had to put pets on life support in the Intensive Care Unit until they are strong enough to breathe on their own again."

The most common types of bite in the Perth area for domestic pets are western brown snakes, dugites and tiger snakes. Death adder bites are seen mainly from the Perth Hills areas.

Owners are urged to keep their pets on a leash in areas such as dunes, long grass, bushland and along rivers.

"Keeping your property well maintained – trimming long grass and avoiding clutter – can go a long way to protecting the area in which pets spend most of their time. It also makes good sense for children and owners' safety too," Dr Griffiths said.

Explore further: Always ask a vet before giving painkillers to pets, expert says

Related Stories

Nine emerging trends in pet food

July 21, 2014

Four out of five pet owners now consider their pet a member of the family, and consumers are shifting their priorities when it comes to purchasing food for their pets accordingly (Mintel, Pet Food, 2013).

Recommended for you

Scientists overcome key CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing hurdle

December 1, 2015

Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT have engineered changes to the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system that significantly cut down on "off-target" ...

Study finds 'rudimentary' empathy in macaques

December 1, 2015

(—A pair of researchers with Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Université Lyon, in France has conducted a study that has shown that macaques have at least some degree of empathy towards their fellow ...

Which came first—the sponge or the comb jelly?

December 1, 2015

Bristol study reaffirms classical view of early animal evolution. Whether sponges or comb jellies (also known as sea gooseberries) represent the oldest extant animal phylum is of crucial importance to our understanding of ...

Trap-jaw ants exhibit previously unseen jumping behavior

December 1, 2015

A species of trap-jaw ant has been found to exhibit a previously unseen jumping behavior, using its legs rather than its powerful jaws. The discovery makes this species, Odontomachus rixosus, the only species of ant that ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Aug 27, 2014
Possibly early spring in Western Australia where MPEC is located but the rest of Australia is still enjoying winter. Would be helpful if articles clearly indicated the country of origin given this site is read internationally.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.