Triangulum galaxy snapped by VST

Aug 06, 2014
The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile has captured this beautifully detailed image of the galaxy Messier 33, often called the Triangulum Galaxy. This nearby spiral, the second closest large galaxy to our own galaxy, the Milky Way, is packed with bright star clusters, and clouds of gas and dust. This picture is amongst the most detailed wide-field views of this object ever taken and shows the many glowing red gas clouds in the spiral arms with particular clarity. Credit: ESO

The VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile has captured a beautifully detailed image of the galaxy Messier 33. This nearby spiral, the second closest large galaxy to our own galaxy, is packed with bright star clusters, and clouds of gas and dust. The new picture is amongst the most detailed wide-field views of this object ever taken and shows the many glowing gas clouds in the spiral arms with particular clarity.

Messier 33, otherwise known as NGC 598, is located about three million light-years away in the small northern constellation of Triangulum (The Triangle). Often known as the Triangulum Galaxy it was observed by the French comet hunter Charles Messier in August 1764, who listed it as number 33 in his famous list of prominent nebulae and . However, he was not the first to record the ; it was probably first documented by the Sicilian astronomer Giovanni Battista Hodierna around 100 years earlier.

Although the Triangulum Galaxy lies in the northern sky, it is just visible from the southern vantage point of ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile. However, it does not rise very high in the sky. This image was taken by the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), a state-of-the-art 2.6-metre survey telescope with a field of view that is twice as broad as the full Moon. This picture was created from many individual exposures, including some taken through a filter passing just the light from glowing hydrogen, which make the red gas clouds in the spiral arms especially prominent.

Among the many star formation regions in Messier 33's spiral arms, the giant nebula NGC 604 stands out. With a diameter of nearly 1500 light-years, this is one of the largest nearby emission nebulae known. It stretches over an area 40 times the size of the visible portion of the much more famous—andmuch closer—Orion Nebula.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
This video journey takes the viewer on a three million light-year trip to the Triangulum Galaxy, Messier 33. The final view, from the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), is amongst the most detailed wide-field views of this object ever taken and shows the many glowing red gas clouds in the spiral arms with particular clarity. Credit: ESO/N. Risinger (skysurvey.org)/David Malin. Music: movetwo

The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy, and about 50 other smaller galaxies. On an extremely clear, dark night, this galaxy is just visible with the unaided eye, and is considered to be the most distant celestial object visible without any optical help. Viewing conditions for the very patient are only set to improve in the long-term: the galaxy is approaching our own at a speed of about 100 000 kilometres per hour.

A closer look at this beautiful new picture not only allows a very detailed inspection of the star-forming of the galaxy, but also reveals the very rich scenery of the more distant galaxies scattered behind the myriad stars and glowing clouds of NGC 598.

Explore further: Image: Our flocculent neighbour, the spiral galaxy M33

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billpress11
5 / 5 (2) Aug 06, 2014
Thanks for the beautiful video, even the music is great.
Shitead
not rated yet Aug 06, 2014
The red hydrogen globules appear to be thousands of light years above the plane of the galaxy. Is this real or is it an artifact of the superposition of photographic images?

Great picture!
Mike_Massen
5 / 5 (2) Aug 06, 2014
You guys might like this,

http://niche.ii.n...nced.swf

Give it time to load, skip the ad (bottom right of box), press Start then wait a few secs (whilst listening to relaxed music) then use the scroll wheel to move through the size scales (ah sigh, tiz a big universe indeed)

ps: Yes the triangulum galaxy is in there :-)