Sweet job: England seeks 'choc doc' to study candy

August 17, 2014

Is there a doctor of chocolate in the house?

Cambridge University in England is seeking a to pursue what sounds like the sweetest job in the world: studying the fundamentals of .

The research goal, according to the job description, is to identify ways of keeping chocolate-based food from melting in warm climates. That's a challenge given that even the best-quality chocolate starts going soft around 34 degrees Celsius (93 Fahrenheit), below .

A solution could fatten the profits of the world's top 10 chocolate companies, which last year posted confectionary sales exceeding $85 billion.

Only European Union citizens can apply for the post under the direction of experts in chemical engineering, geotechnical engineering and soft matter physics.

Explore further: Chocolate lovers fight proposed FDA change

More information: Job application: www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/4702/

Related Stories

Finally, a way to authenticate premium chocolate

January 15, 2014

For some people, nothing can top a morsel of luxuriously rich, premium chocolate. But until now, other than depending on their taste buds, chocolate connoisseurs had no way of knowing whether they were getting what they paid ...

Recommended for you

From a very old skeleton, new insights on ancient migrations

October 9, 2015

Three years ago, a group of researchers found a cave in Ethiopia with a secret: it held the 4,500-year-old remains of a man, with his head resting on a rock pillow, his hands folded under his face, and stone flake tools surrounding ...

Mexican site yields new details of sacrifice of Spaniards

October 9, 2015

It was one of the worst defeats in one of history's most dramatic conquests: Only a year after Hernan Cortes landed in Mexico, hundreds of people in a Spanish-led convey were captured, sacrificed and apparently eaten.

Ancient genome from Africa sequenced for the first time

October 8, 2015

The first ancient human genome from Africa to be sequenced has revealed that a wave of migration back into Africa from Western Eurasia around 3,000 years ago was up to twice as significant as previously thought, and affected ...

Who you gonna trust? How power affects our faith in others

October 6, 2015

One of the ongoing themes of the current presidential campaign is that Americans are becoming increasingly distrustful of those who walk the corridors of power – Exhibit A being the Republican presidential primary, in which ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.