New non-invasive device tests the quality of chicken products

August 20, 2014
Researcher testing the device

Researchers of the Universitat Politècnica de València have developed a new device that tells us the state of conservation of poultry and detects malformations analyzing its electrical properties. It is a non-invasive system that would help to guarantee the quality of the final product before it is delivered to the consumer.

The is a product of the joint work between the Institute of Food Engineering for Development and the Institute for Molecular Imaging Technologies (UPV-CSIC-CIEMAT). It has been manufactured by 3D printing techniques, it incorporates an advanced sensor that quickly and easily registers the of the product and obtains a precise diagnosis of its quality.

According to Pedro J. Fito, researcher at the Institute of Food Engineering for Development of the UPV, chicken meat can have internal problems that cannot be seen or noticed with the techniques that are applied today, mostly when the entire, uncut piece, is sold.

"Our device permits us go beyond; with a simple "shot" we can find out precisely what the properties are and identify, at a metabolic level, any biochemical or structural transformation in the product. What we have done is to develop medical techniques applied to the meat industry in order to detect those internal ," says Pedro J. Fito.

Researchers in UPV lab

Researchers explain that this new sensor is intended for use before the packaging line. "The device would help in removing birds with malformations from the line, preventing a low-quality product from reaching the consumer," explains Ricardo J. Colom, researcher at the institute for Molecular Imaging Technologies (UPV-CSIC-CIEMAT).

Among its advantages, Colom emphasizes it is simply a reconfigurable device, and it can be adapted to the necessities of any user.

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