Microsoft to unveil new Windows software

Aug 21, 2014
A news report indicates that Microsoft is poised to give the world a glimpse at a new-generation computer operating system that will succeed Windows 8

A news report out Thursday indicated that Microsoft is poised to give the world a glimpse at a new-generation computer operating system that will succeed Windows 8.

The US software titan could hold an event as early as the end of September to provide a look at a version of what is expected to be called "Windows 9," according to technology news website The Verge.

The introduction will be aimed at developers behind programs designed for computers powered by Windows software.

Microsoft was said to be working on a separate version of Windows for smartphones and tablets.

Explore further: Microsoft hoping users will get friends, family to leave Windows XP

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winthrom
5 / 5 (1) Aug 21, 2014
Lets see: M$ only supports their three latest releases. Currently VISTA, WIN-7, WIN-8. Vista was a disaster, so why not deep six it. "As you say, Master!" and Genie puts M$ in position for greater profits. Since M$ is not doing well with touch screen desktop PCs, and since businesses are fed up with the M$ release treadmill, the next release should be much more desktop capable and still work on tablets and phones. Expect better business applications on the tablets. Possibly a tablet to desktop to cloud-server docking capability. This will need very good type 2 encryption so expect the tablet to be an image of the desktop, which is actually running on a server in the business somewhere. In homes it will be tablet to desktop with cloud downloading. For phones, just a miniature tablet.
rp142
5 / 5 (4) Aug 21, 2014
Vista and win 8 have both been complete failures. Win 8 seemed to be designed for casual PC users and not those trying to use a PC for real work. I will be sticking with win 7 until they actually bring out something with improvements.

On the positive side, win 8 did make it a lot easier to move friends and family over to Linux... They had a new interface to learn anyway, might as well make that KDE and give them an easier learning curve than win 8.
Nik_2213
5 / 5 (1) Aug 21, 2014
For Pete's sake, Microsoft !! I've just about house-trained my 8.1u1 to something useful --Looks like XP-- when you come up with yet-another version. And will you expect me to pay for it, too ??
Toiea
1 / 5 (4) Aug 21, 2014
When the Windows are so wrong, why the Germans are returning to it? Aren't they just plain silly?
italba
4.5 / 5 (4) Aug 21, 2014
@Toiea: Just plain FUD, check http://www.techre...windows/
Lex Talonis
3 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2014
Oh goody - my favourite topic - Microsoft Bashing....

I have evolved too.

Microsoft brings out a new OS.. or a repackaged old OS...

Well who cares.

I escaped their idiot bullshit a LONG time ago....
alfie_null
3 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2014
Microsoft's big challenge will not so much be developing this, as convincing people they need it. Thus less effort in engineering and more in marketing. And so the company evolves?

Don't know what they need to get out of their rut, but I get the impression things are horribly inefficient, ineffective. So many people working on their products and what do we get? A new UI? I've been around long enough to remember alternatives to Word, for instance. Before they were squashed by the juggernaut. How much better is Word today than say, FrameMaker of twenty years ago?
Watebba
1 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2014
@Toiea: Just plain FUD, check http://www.techre...windows/
Well, I got it from multiple sources, including these German ones.
italba
3 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2014
@Watebba: I can say nothing more than what's written in the techrepublic's article I linked. The project to switch to Linux some 15000 PC finished last year, and Munich's council has just commissioned a report to see the results of this switch. WOULD this report be absolutely negative (it's just starting!), the council MAY decide to switch back to Windows.
baudrunner
3 / 5 (2) Aug 23, 2014
Massive YAAA-A-A_AA_A_A_A_A_WWWWN!

I've been interpreting all releases of Windows subsequent to Windows 95 as an apology for the Windows OS's that went before it. I wonder what they found wrong with Windows 8 now? Sorry, not buying into it.

Incidentally, if you have windows 7 Home Premium, you can upgrade to Ultimate for free...

http://beatthehac...ion.html

way to stick it to the man..!

Toiea
3 / 5 (1) Aug 23, 2014
WOULD this report be absolutely negative (it's just starting!), the council MAY decide to switch back to Windows
Well, we'll see after while. The main problem of non-Windows solutions at desktop isn't the quality of underlying software (the Linux kernel is truly rudimental component here) - but the cost of another programming and development. Which is already pretty high at the case of municipal applications (it's already a specialized target) and when you switch to some alternative platform, you're forced to pay even more for the luxury of specialists. Not to say, most of Linux based computers at Munich are actually running Wine and/or remote control software for running of normal windows applications. This virtualization increases the cost of HW (you need a stronger computer for to achieve the same power and user experience) which wipes out most of savings for Windows licenses.
baudrunner
4 / 5 (2) Aug 24, 2014
It's the gullible public who think that OS upgrades are mandatory and they're buying into them. It's usually not necessary. You have to ask yourself, what am I using this computer for? I am certain that there are still plenty of small to medium sized mom-and-pop businesses running in-house developed Clipper or FoxBase relational DBMS applications on 486 DX's using the DOS platform. For that matter, they can still even be used in small industrial environments, in shipping departments and the like. Does the average person really need an engineering workstation for CAD? Also, a faster computer and upgraded OS isn't going to improve your internet experience much. Your internet speed is equal to the speed of the slowest modem in the connection, after all, and even those old DOS-based systems can show impressive performance on a cable or DSL connection. I mean, if that's all you're doing..
zaxxon451
5 / 5 (1) Aug 25, 2014
Microsoft's big challenge will not so much be developing this, as convincing people they need it.


Convincing people to buy something they don't need is their business model, as well as the foundation of capitalism.
winthrom
5 / 5 (1) Aug 25, 2014
One should also note that M$ built WIN 7 on the VISTA foundation, so eliminating support for that base, i.e., ending updates for a weak O/S, when all hands are needed to fix their newer O/S disasters is in the best interests of stockholders. Their problem now is that WIN 7 was taken up as the business O/S because WIN-XP was/is dead. WIN 7 most resembles the WIN-XP that most companies trained their employees on. The next O/S had better look/work like WIN-XP in the business area. The great "Ribbon" change to M$ WORD cost business millions of dollars in lost productivity while employees learned to navigate the same old word processor in new clothes. This repetitious interface changing adds no new important properties to the current business model and neither does "the cloud" do much considering CITRIX like terminal software for cluster servers. In note 1 (above) you see my guesses for M$ future O/S. I doubt there is much else they can do except go Unix like Apple did.
Toiea
3.5 / 5 (2) Aug 25, 2014
The great "Ribbon" change to M$ WORD cost business millions of dollars in lost productivity while employees learned to navigate the same old word processor in new clothes.
Microsoft just tried to make the Office more accessible for large screens and touch sensitive displays (tablets). It's still not an apology for the lack of backward compatibility. Some changes are rather insensitive to users and MS will pay for it. IMO the backward compatibility would also help the market of SW (after all, as the lack of Start button in MUI illustrated well). For me such step was rather surprising from MS, from Ballmer the more - he sells the software for years and it's still testing the marketing on its flagship products like the greenhorn.
baudrunner
5 / 5 (2) Aug 25, 2014
MS will probably leave a vulnerability in Windows 9 so that the consumer can pay for another upgrade to fix that. It's their basic strategy.

Computer OS's should be the domain of the computer manufacturers. That way, upgrading the CPU automatically upgrades the OS. With the OS built into the hardware, there is no vulnerability for hackers to exploit. Microsoft is the ghost in the machine, the spanner in the works, the Murphy behind all the things that go wrong with Windows. MS plans it that way.
Toiea
3.5 / 5 (2) Aug 25, 2014
MS will probably leave a vulnerability in Windows 9 so that the consumer can pay for another upgrade to fix that. It's their basic strategy
I don't think so. Last security hot-fix for thirteen years old Windows XP had been released in April 2014. Which other manufacturer of SW supports thirteen years old versions of SW today? You shouldn't forget, there is still lotta Windows XP installations over the net and their massive vulnerability would represent a threat even for modern version due to various botnets. The Windows 9 suck so much at desktops, that most users will rather pay for their upgrade willingly... ;-)
winthrom
3 / 5 (1) Aug 25, 2014
For M$, the future is now. IBM gets it, M$ does not. Computers are rapidly following the evolution of the brain. The development of multiple core CPUs is opening the expansion of separate processing areas for separate functions. Intel multi-core CPUs is just one area for this. The multi-core video processors are ganged to make super-computers, so expect future O/S systems to develop specialized segments for these functions. The hypervisor will be the conscious component using slave multi-cores for audio in, audio out, vision in, display out, massive parallel processing for each of these functions to include fuzzy logic, data-base search-retrieve-insertion, machine learning, evolution self programming, etc.

In time these will be robotic. Cars are self driving, self parking, etc. Planes will do the same so personal air transport seems likely. Ships, trains, will adapt. Eventually space will have intelligent robots (think Mars tera-forming systems). M$ has no vision. They will die.
baudrunner
5 / 5 (1) Aug 26, 2014
M$ has no vision. They will die.
Unfortunately, probably not. Bill Gates will just buy up MS stock to keep it from sliding into oblivion, like last time, then MS will come out with Windows 10 to pay for it all. Face it, MS is the ultimate monopoly in the commercial PC OS market, and it is sanctioned by all the bodies in government who would otherwise prosecute. I can just hear John D. Rockefeller turning over in his grave shouting, "no fair!" It's ironic that principle adviser to J.D. was a guy by the name of Frederick T. Gates.