Maritime test bed to demonstrate advanced analytical capabilities for US Navy

Aug 20, 2014 by Suzanne Smith
Maritime Test Bed to Demonstrate Advanced Analytical Capabilities for U.S. Navy
The test bed was recently use to show how simulated Aegis radar data could be fused with other integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sensor data.

Using a newly developed advanced maritime test bed, Lockheed Martin recently demonstrated how continually evolving technologies such as data fusion and predictive analytics can be used to share intelligence quickly and securely – even in limited bandwidth naval settings.

This new software test platform, designed to mimic different naval environments at sea and ashore, allowed Lockheed Martin to validate sophisticated intelligence, communications and sensor systems before they are introduced in an operational setting.

"The Navy is confronted with unique challenges that require superior, faster intelligence sharing," said Dr. Rob Smith, vice president of C4ISR for Lockheed Martin's Information Systems and Global Solutions. "The maritime provides a cost effective, risk reduction platform that can be used for realistic testing to demonstrate what is possible – with the end goal of providing real-time, decision-quality intelligence for the Navy."

In its recent demonstration, Lockheed Martin used its test bed to illustrate how the Navy could fuse simulated Aegis radar data with other integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sensor data to provide a comprehensive picture of the battlespace. Throughout the scenario, the test bed collected, analyzed and processed the data, then distributed to simulated platforms at sea and on shore. This collaborative atmosphere allowed users to operate more efficiently, since all units had access to integrated ISR-related activities, which in turn improved situational awareness and battle management planning.

The maritime test bed was developed with open standards software infrastructure, which allows it to leverage multiple information sources and databases for testing.

For testing highly sensitive technologies, the maritime test bed can be linked to the Secret Defense Research and Engineering Network (SDREN) as well as the Defense Research and Engineering Network (DREN). Lockheed Martin will use the test bed with all customers who wish to test C4ISR capabilities to foster a more seamless transition into real-world operations.

Explore further: Lockheed Martin conducts first fully autonomous robot mission

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US Navy practices retrieving Orion spacecraft

Aug 07, 2014

The U.S. Navy and NASA completed the second round of practice recoveries of the Orion spacecraft, which is designed to bring humans to the moon, asteroids and, eventually, to Mars.

Lockheed Martin hit by cyber attack

May 29, 2011

Hackers launched a "significant and tenacious" cyber attack on Lockheed Martin, a major defense contractor holding highly sensitive information, but its secrets remained safe, the company said Saturday.

Recommended for you

Hit 'Just Dance' game goes mobile Sept. 25

Sep 18, 2014

Smartphone lovers will get to show off moves almost anywhere with the Sept. 25 release of a free "Just Dance Now" game tuned for mobile Internet lifestyles.

Indie game developers sprouting at Tokyo Game Show

Sep 18, 2014

Nestled among the industry giants at the Tokyo Game Show Thursday are a growing number of small and independent games developers from Asia and Europe, all hoping they are sitting on the next Minecraft.

Review: Ambitious 'Destiny' lacks imagination

Sep 18, 2014

Midway through "Destiny," the new science fiction epic from "Halo" creators Bungie, a smug prince is musing on the hero's desire to visit a mysterious site on Mars.

User comments : 0