Hewlett-Packard recalls 5 million AC power cords

August 26, 2014

Hewlett-Packard Company is recalling about 5.6 million notebook computer AC power cords in this country and another 446,700 in Canada because of possible overheating, which can pose a fire and burn hazard.

HP has received 29 reports of power cords overheating and melting or charring, resulting in two claims of minor burns and 13 claims of minor property damage.

The Hewlett-Packard LS-15 AC power cords were distributed with HP and Compaq notebook and mini , and with AC adapter-powered accessories including docking stations.

The power cords are black and have an "LS-15" molded on the AC adapter end of the cord. They were manufactured in China.

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ROBTHEGOB
1 / 5 (1) Aug 27, 2014
Made in China. What a surprise.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Aug 27, 2014
You get what you pay for. If you just go "Oh, the Chinese are offering to do it for super low price - let's outsource this!" without suspecting that they might cut some corners quality/testing-wise then that's just naive.
It's not like China has some miracle setup that makes things substantially cheaper (except no environmental regulations).

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