GPS satellite launched into space

Aug 02, 2014

A new Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite has been launched into space.

An unmanned Atlas 5 rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station shortly before midnight Friday.

The rocket carried a GPS 2F-7 spacecraft which will join a constellation of other satellites already orbiting 11,000 miles above Earth. The GPS satellite will provide navigation for both military and civilian users.

The craft, when it becomes operational, will replace a 17-year-old satellite. The older satellite will be used as a back-up for the new one.

This was the second launch from Cape Canaveral this week. A Delta 4 rocket lifted off on Monday, carrying a pair of .

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alfie_null
not rated yet Aug 03, 2014
Counting down the inventory of RD-180s. Looking forward to seeing them replaced with home-grown technology like SpaceX's Falcon and its engines.
PhotonX
not rated yet Aug 03, 2014
Counting down the inventory of RD-180s. Looking forward to seeing them replaced with home-grown technology like SpaceX's Falcon and its engines.

Or just swipe the RD-180 specs and build US copies. It isn't as though the USSR/Russia hasn't stolen plenty of tech from the US over the years. Unless the Tu-4 just *happened* to look exactly like the B-29 right down to the rivet holes.