Google buys product design firm Gecko

August 22, 2014
The Google logo is seen at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California on September 02, 2011

Google on Friday confirmed that it bought Gecko Design to bolster its lab devoted to technology-advancing projects such as self-driving cars and Internet-linked Glass eyewear.

Gecko Design specializes in working with engineers on designs early in the creation of .

"This is an incredible opportunity for everyone at Gecko," president Jacques Gagne said in a post on the company's website.

"We are very excited and honored to join Google X and work on a variety of cutting edge products," he said, referring to Google's reserach lab.

Financial details of the acquisition were not disclosed.

Gecko was founded about eight years ago and is based in Northern California not far from Google headquarters.

Explore further: Google Glass for consumers will 'take a while', Schmidt says

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