Gamer disclaimer: Virtual worlds can be as fulfilling as real life

Aug 15, 2014 by Michael Kasumovic, The Conversation

Step aside Olympians – the new sporting pursuit of choice may soon be professional gaming. Electronic sports (or esports) are now mainstream, drawing more than a million viewers in large tournaments and offering prizes up to US$5 million.

Unsurprisingly, pro-gamers practise for around 10 hours a day, but non-professionals can also spend hours in front of a screen, forsaking real life. Are they missing out? Can a virtual life be equally or more fulfilling than a real one? And should gamers power down and feel the grass beneath their feet?

Some research from the past weeks sheds interesting light on gaming's effects on life, work and school – and it's not all bad.

More than 1 billion gamers served

A restaurant without returning customers won't last long, and video games and their developers are no different. Among game genres, the massive multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) is the McDonald's of customers served.

MMOPRGs are defined by having no ending and simply continue into more difficult quests that require higher levels and a greater amount of collaboration.

Excelling at these games thus requires a significant time commitment and a large online social group to grind the higher levels necessary. It is reasonable to assume, then, that these games devour the free time necessary to maintain an offline – or "real life" – lifestyle.

Forthcoming Australian research in the Australian Journal of Psychology surveyed 1,945 gamers over the age of 14 and explored whether MMORPGs were associated with relatively greater life interference and psychopathology.

What they found is not surprising – MMORPG players played for significantly longer and were more likely to play every day. What was surprising, though, was the mental anguish these players felt.

They couldn't imagine life without their game, felt irritable when not playing and had recurrent thoughts about playing while not playing. Most interestingly, they played even when they didn't want to. They felt that their work, study and relationships were affected, as they had fewer offline social interactions and friends.

But there are two ways to interpret these results:

  1. MMORPG players are missing out on what non-gamers would call "real life", so they simply feel awful about it.
  2. MMORPG players feel bad about spending so much time playing online because society views it as a waste of time.

The results don't allow us to distinguish between these two possibilities, but it's important to do so because they highlight two separate problems; one is with individuals and the other with society. To understand where the problem lies requires exploring who it is that plays these games and why.

Is an online friend just as sweet?

If games are an opportunity to escape reality, then they are also a way to escape uncomfortable social interactions. There is evidence that shy individuals prefer online spaces because they offer them more control over social interactions. As a result, it suggests MMORPGs may serve a purpose for many gamers.

In a German study published last month, researchers explored whether individuals who spent more time gaming online differed in their emotional sensitivity. The also examined the extent of their friends in both an online and offline environment.

What they found was that shy individuals had more online friends who they also met with offline. They also transferred more of their offline friends online. In other words, shy gamers are using online social environments to establish and maintain their friendships in a manner that is comfortable for them.

Should we then deny shy individuals a modicum of comfort just because society views online time as a life squandered?

Leave no child behind

As adults, we gained enough experience to understand how to navigate various time requirements and should not feel guilty about how we spend our free time. But children don't have this experience. Should we regulate their game time to ensure no negative effects on school performance and friendships?

Three studies published this year shed some light on this question:

The first, examining 192,000 teenagers in 22 countries, showed that academic performance in science, maths or reading wasn't affected by playing single or multiplayer games.

A second study examining 27,000 middle-schoolers (12-13 years old) in France showed that video games did not decrease cognitive ability, regardless of the type of game played (but children that read more showed a slightly improved cognitive ability).

And a study of 4,899 UK middle-schoolers showed that children who played for less than an hour a day had increased prosocial behaviour and life satisfaction and a decreased internalisation and externalisation of problems. These effects were reversed for those who played for more than three hours, so too much game play might be detrimental.

Together, this research suggests that children are largely using their extra time to play video games and as long as they don't forsake other duties, they'll be fine. I could have used this evidence when I was growing up.

Spend 100 hours in their gaming chair

Taking the usual caveats about studies with self-reporting, the studies I mention above suggest that we're all not doing too badly. We're creating online spaces that make people feel more comfortable, and potentially even helping them to navigate social environments they previously feared. Could that be a bad thing?

These studies also demonstrate that the best thing we can do for our kids is to teach them to navigate technology. Variety is the spice of life, and demonstrating this variety is the responsibility of adults.

And when kids become adults, if they decide that spending their time playing online is most satisfying, well, rather than asking them to walk a mile in your shoes, maybe we should spend some time in their gaming chair to understand how they really feel.

Explore further: Online games addiction a cause of poor mental health?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study finds gaming augments players' social lives

Mar 27, 2014

New research finds that online social behavior isn't replacing offline social behavior in the gaming community. Instead, online gaming is expanding players' social lives. The study was done by researchers ...

Video games can be beneficial for post-work recovery

Jun 17, 2014

Videogames have a had a particularly bad rap lately, not least after a UK coroner suggested a link between Call of Duty and teenage suicide. But recent evidence suggests that gaming can be good for us and, ...

Not all gamers are low scorers on friendships, relationships

Dec 20, 2012

Not all video game players are destined for lives filled with failing relationships and dwindling friendships, according to Penn State researchers, who say that a lot depends on the role of the game-playing activity in the ...

Recommended for you

US official: Auto safety agency under review

Oct 24, 2014

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Christian Bale to play Apple's Steve Jobs

Oct 23, 2014

Oscar-winner Christian Bale—best known for his star turn as Batman in the blockbuster "Dark Knight" films—will play Apple co-founder Steve Jobs in an upcoming biopic.

How to find a submarine

Oct 23, 2014

Das Boot, The Hunt for Red October, The Bedford Incident, We Dive At Dawn: films based on submariners' experience reflect the tense and unusual nature of undersea warfare – where it is often not how well ...

Government ups air bag warning to 7.8M vehicles (Update)

Oct 22, 2014

The U.S. government is now urging owners of nearly 8 million cars and trucks to have the air bags repaired because of potential danger to drivers and passengers. But the effort is being complicated by confusing ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

julianpenrod
not rated yet Aug 15, 2014
So, the "study" "concludes" that players of massive mutliplayer online role-playing games fixate on the game, can't imagine being without it, are antsy when not playing, fantasize about playing when not playing, obsessively play even when they don't want to, and sacrifice real pleasantnesses for the game because they are upset about missing out on real life or they are embarrassed by playing so much? There is an old precept that there are those who will say any lie and there are those who will believe them.