Feds allows logging after huge California wildfire

Aug 28, 2014 by Scott Smith
In this Sept. 25, 2013 file photo, Scott Small, and other National Forest Service crew members work to restore terrain that was bulldozed for a firebreak in the battle against Rim Fire on a nordic ski trail along Dodge Ridge in the Stanislaus National Forest, near Tuolumne City, Calif. The Forest Service says it will release a final decision Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014, on how much timber to log from the Sierra Nevada's largest wildfire in recorded history. Last year's Rim Fire burned 400 square miles including parts of Yosemite. A debate has since raged about sending burned and dead trees to lumber mills or leave them and let nature take its course. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

The U.S. Forest Service has decided to allow logging on nearly 52 square miles of the Sierra Nevada burned last year in a massive California wildfire, a move contested by environmentalists.

The decision released Wednesday comes one year after the Rim Fire scorched more than 400 square miles, including parts of Yosemite National Park. The blaze was the largest on record for the Sierra and the state's third largest wildfire.

Environmentalists had argued against logging the land, saying the blackened trees and new growth beneath them create vital habitat for dwindling birds such as and black-backed woodpeckers. Supporters of the timber industry said logging would pay for replanting and restoring the forest and allow the public to use the land.

Explore further: Wildfire near Yosemite sparks 13,000 evacuation orders

Related Stories

Squelching Sierra fires left forest ready to burn

Aug 28, 2013

Unnaturally long intervals between wildfires and years of drought primed the Sierra Nevada for the explosive conflagration burning the rugged landscape on the edge of Yosemite National Park, forestry experts ...

79 years of monitoring demonstrates dramatic forest change

Jan 06, 2014

Long-term changes to forests affect biodiversity and how future fires burn. A team of scientists led by Research Ecologist Dr. Eric Knapp, from the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station, found dramatic ...

Recommended for you

Drought damage leads to widespread forest death

19 hours ago

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling ...

Good luck and the Chinese reverse global forest loss

19 hours ago

Analysis of 20 years of satellite data has revealed the total amount of vegetation globally has increased by almost 4 billion tonnes of carbon since 2003. This is despite ongoing large-scale deforestation ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.