Dead two-headed dolphin discovered in Turkey

August 11, 2014
In this photo of con-joined dolphin taken by gym teacher Tugrul Metin, while he was vacationing during the first few days of August 2014, in the Aegean Sea coastal town of Dikili, Izmir province of Turkey. Turkish media reports on Monday Aug. 11, 2014, that Turkish marine biologists will examine the con-joined two-headed dolphin calf that has washed up on a beach in western Turkey. (AP Photo / Tugrul Metin) TURKEY OUT - ONLINE OUT

Turkish media reports say Turkish scientists will examine a two-headed dolphin that washed up on a beach in western Turkey.

The private Dogan news agency said the remains of conjoined dolphin calf were discovered on a beach in Dikili, near the Aegean city of Izmir last week by a vacationing gym teacher.

It quoted Akdeniz University marine biologist Mehmet Gokoglu as saying the dolphin was a rare occurrence, similar to conjoined twins.

Marine biologists at Akdeniz University will study the dolphin.

Explore further: Deaf dolphin rescued in La. is going to Miss.

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