Really smart cars are ready to take the wheel

Jul 17, 2014 by Laure Fillon
A Range Rover Evoque equipped with Valeo self-parking technology backs into a parking spot during a driverless car demo at the International CES in Las Vegas on January 8, 2014

Why waste your time looking for a place to park when your car can do it for you? An idea that was pure science fiction only a few years ago is becoming reality thanks to automatic robot cars.

A car with no one on board drives into a at walking pace, lets a pedestrian pass, and then backs into a narrow parking space without the merest bump or scrape.

The that makes this possible has been developed by the Swedish car company Volvo and the French parts maker Valeo. It is still at the prototype stage but could be widely available within six years.

Some cars are already able to drive themselves in certain circumstances. The Mercedes CLS coupe brakes by itself when the driver fails to react to the risk of an accident. Some BMW models also warn drivers they are about to go over the white line and they can go onto automatic pilot in traffic jams.

"Lots of the technology is already out there," said Guillaume Devauchelle, director of Research and Development at Valeo. "But now we are at a turning point." Rapid progress in radar and detection camera technology now allows cars to "see" things going on around them. Onboard computers analyse road conditions and make the car react accordingly.

Which means that believe that they will have models on the market capable of driving by themselves by 2020, and utterly autonomous robot cars by 2030.

A Valeo representative swipes his finger across an iPhone to initiate a self parking demonstration at the International CES in Las Vegas on January 8, 2014

This could radically cut mortality, said Franck Cazenave, marketing director at the parts maker Bosch, since "90 percent of accidents are caused by human error".

Who to blame for an accident?

There are other benefits too. As soon as cars begin to talk to one another, and with the computers running the road system, traffic will run more smoothly with huge savings on fuel.

An interior view of a Google self-driving car is pictured in Mountain View, California on May 13, 2014

According to Sebastien Amichi, an expert at consultants Roland Berger, after 2030 there could be "fleets of vehicles available 24/7 that will come to pick you up where ever you want, and do so with amazing efficiency".

These really smart cars will also make travel that much more comfortable, their supporters claim. "Drivers won't have to drive so they will have that time for themselves," says Cazenave. They will be able to read, surf the net, or even have a nap—which is why not only car markers have been attracted by the possibilities this offers.

Google has been testing fully automatic Japanese cars for the last five years and is even making its own electric driverless cars that make us of its Internet and mapping expertise.

A Google self-driving car is pictured in Mountain View, California, on May 13, 2014

Even so, others in the industry such as Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Renault and Nissan, argue that car-marking is an art not everyone could pull off.

And, of course, there is the prohibitive cost of the technology. The radar system alone on a Google car is said to cost 60,000 euros ($82,000), without counting existing auto-pilot technology that costs thousands of euros.

"What is still holding us up is the quality of the sensors and of artificial intelligence," Ford has admitted. And though everyone thinks that the next decade will see automatic robot cars driving on their own on motorways and in car parks, having them in the middle of urban traffic with pedestrians and cyclists, is another question. The big issue is who is to blame if there is an accident.

A camera in the front grill of Google's self-driving car in Mountain View, California, on May 13, 2014

Before tackling this thorny question, governments will have to change road safety laws which demand that every driver "must be in control of their vehicle".

As for the drivers themselves, some will undoubtedly be happy to hand over the wheel. Others though will be reluctant to put their lives in the hands of a computer—not to mention foreswearing for ever the pleasure of putting their foot to the floor.

Explore further: Electronic valet parks the car, no tip required

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cruise aims to bring driverless tech to life in 2015

Jun 24, 2014

The old saying why reinvent the wheel will resonate with the coming debut of Cruise technology in certain cars on certain roads next year. The motivating question would be, Why wait to buy a totally driverless ...

Sweden joins race for self-driving cars

Dec 02, 2013

A hundred self-driving Volvo cars will roll onto public roads in and around the Swedish city of Gothenburg in 2017, the Chinese-owned car maker said Monday.

Recommended for you

Cyclist's helmet, Volvo car to communicate for safety

13 hours ago

Volvo calls it "a wearable life-saving wearable cycling tech concept." The car maker is referring to a connected car and helmet prototype that enables two-way communication between Volvo drivers and cyclists ...

California puzzles over safety of driverless cars

13 hours ago

California's Department of Motor Vehicles will miss a year-end deadline to adopt new rules for cars of the future because regulators first have to figure out how they'll know whether "driverless" vehicles ...

Cadillac CT6 will get streaming video mirror

Dec 20, 2014

Cadillac said Thursday it will add high resolution streaming video to the function of a rearview mirror, so that the driver's vision and safety can be enhanced. The technology will debut on the 2016 Cadillac ...

Poll: Americans skeptical of commercial drones (Update)

Dec 19, 2014

Americans broadly back tight regulations on commercial drone operators, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll, as concerns about privacy and safety override the potential benefits of the heralded drone ...

Cheaper, more powerful VR system for engineers

Dec 17, 2014

It's like a scene from a gamer's wildest dreams: 12 high-definition, 55-inch 3D televisions all connected to a computer capable of supporting high-end, graphics-intensive gaming.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Captain Stumpy
4 / 5 (1) Jul 17, 2014
I would really LOVE an automated vehicle on a long trip... say in my motor home... but I don't think I would like it any other time.

Not that I am a control freak, but I truly enjoy driving.

there is nothing like a quiet drive through an uninhabited area of mountains and then getting off the main road to take to the wilderness for an impromptu exploration.

I might like the safety when the automated vehicles establish themselves and show an increased survival rating as well as decreased road altercation rating (from tiny bumps to being run off the road)

I am still looking forward to this though! especially the ability to travel while I nap!
it is MUCH to hard to do at this time...

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.