NASA catches two tropical troublemakers in Northwestern Pacific: Halong and 96W

Jul 30, 2014
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over both developing System 96W (left) and Tropical Storm Halong (right) on July 30 and had powerful thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

There are two tropical low pressure areas in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean today and they're close enough to each other to be captured in one image generated from data gathered by NASA's Aqua satellite.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over both Tropical Storm Halong and developing System 96W early on July 30 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured infrared data on them in one image. Both systems show powerful thunderstorms stretching high into the troposphere with cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C. Those thunderstorms have the potential for heavy rainfall.

The latest update from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) places the center of the storm about 75 nautical miles (86.3 miles/138.9 km) northwest of Navsta, Guam, near 14.4 north latitude and 143.4 east longitude. Halong's maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots (57.4 mph/92.6 kph). The JTWC expects Halong to strengthen to typhoon status by August 1. Halong was moving to the west at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

Halong is moving through the Marianas Islands and has generated a Tropical Storm Warning for Guam and a Typhoon Warning for Rota.

To the west of Tropical Storm Halong lies the developing tropical low known as System 96W. Enhanced infrared satellite imagery on July 30 showed that System 96W appeared to be more organized.

This 'head-on' image of Tropical Storm Halong from NASA's Aqua satellite on July 29 at 11:47 a.m. EDT shows the circular shape of the storm and strongest thunderstorms (purple). Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

System 96W is now located near 19.9 north latitude and 130.5 east longitude, about 416 nautical miles south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) described System 96W as a monsoon depression with improved deep convection begins to consolidate as a typical tropical cyclone. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated between 20 to 25 knots (23.0 to 28.7 mph / 37.0 to 46.3 kph. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 996 millibars.

The JTWC gives System 96W a high chance of becoming the Northwestern Pacific's next tropical depression in the next 24 hours.

Explore further: NASA sees developing Tropical Storm Halong causing warning

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees rainfall in newborn Tropical Depression 8W

Jul 03, 2014

Powerful thunderstorms in some areas of newborn Tropical Depression 08W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean were dropping heavy rainfall on July 3 as NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite ...

NASA sees powerful thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Matmo

Jul 18, 2014

Strong thunderstorms reaching toward the top of the troposphere circled Tropical Storm Matmo's center and appeared in a band of thunderstorms on the storm's southwestern quadrant. Infrared imagery from NASA's ...

NASA satellites see Neoguri grow into a super typhoon

Jul 07, 2014

From July 4 to July 7 Tropical Cyclone Neoguri strengthened from a tropical storm into a supertyphoon. NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites passed over the rapidly intensifying storm and provided forecasters ...

Recommended for you

NASA HS3 instrument views two dimensions of clouds

16 hours ago

NASA's Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument, flying aboard an unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in this summer's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission, is studying the changing profile of the atmosphere ...

Research drones launched into Hurricane Edouard

18 hours ago

U.S. government scientists are launching winged drones into Hurricane Edouard, hoping to collect data that could help forecasters understand what makes some storms strengthen into monsters while others fade away.

User comments : 0