NASA resets launch of carbon-monitoring satellite

Jul 02, 2014

The launch of a NASA satellite designed to study atmospheric carbon dioxide has been rescheduled for early Wednesday.

A Delta 2 rocket carrying the satellite had been scheduled to lift off early Tuesday from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

NASA says the countdown stopped at 46 seconds because of the failure of a system that suppresses acoustic energy and protects a launch pad flame duct.

The agency says it replaced a bad valve and the launch will now take place during a 30-second window opening at 2:56 a.m. PDT.

The satellite, dubbed Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, is a replacement for a satellite destroyed during a failed launch in 2009.

The $468 million mission will collect global measurements of CO2 in Earth's atmosphere, the main driver of climate change.

Explore further: NASA to try carbon satellite launch on Wednesday

Related Stories

Recommended for you

How bad can solar storms get?

May 22, 2015

Our sun regularly pelts the Earth with all kinds of radiation and charged particles. How bad can these solar storms get?

Mars rover's ChemCam instrument gets sharper vision

May 22, 2015

NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover's "ChemCam" instrument just got a major capability fix, as Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists uploaded a software repair for the auto-focus system on the instrument.

GOES-R satellite begins environmental testing

May 21, 2015

The GOES-R satellite, slated to launch in 2016, is ready for environmental testing. Environmental testing simulates the harsh conditions of launch and the space environment once the satellite is in orbit. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.