MindRDR lets Google Glass users take photos and post them using only concentration

Jul 11, 2014 by Bob Yirka report

A team at interactive studio company This Place has announced the development of an app for Google Glass that provides a bridge between the wearable device (via Bluetooth) and a Neurosky EEG biosensor headset—allowing the wearer of both to take a photograph and post it to Facebook or Twitter using only their mind.

Google Glass has pros and cons—it's worn on the face, thus it doesn't have to be held, and with a lens right over the eye, it can be used for a huge variety of purposes. On the down side, commands are given by voice, "Okay Glass…" or by sliding a finger along the side-frame. By most accounts, both approaches leave much to be desired—speaking out loud to your device in public can be either annoying to others or embarrassing to the user, while stroking the side-frame can grow tiresome. Into this void steps the folks at This Place—they want people to be able to give Google Glass commands using only thoughts. MindRDR is just the first tiny baby-step. The app takes data from the EEG sensor and converts it to visual information via a white line overlaid over imagery in the camera's viewfinder. Concentrating on the line causes it to slowly move upwards. When it reaches the top of the viewfinder, a picture is taken—repeating the exercise results in the photo being posted to either the user's Facebook or Twitter account.

Clearly, this is not rocket science, but it's not supposed to be. The team at This Place acknowledge the limitations of the app but at the same time suggest it should be viewed not as something anyone would want now, but something that will develop into something truly useful, which users will want. To help make that happen, they've released the code for the , making it open source. The hope is that other groups will take the technology further, adding functionality, reducing the size of the EEG sensor—doing things that will result in users someday being able to control the device entirely with their mind.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Thus far it appears that executives at Google are not impressed—they've released a statement reminding people that Glass cannot read your mind. Reps for the company say they haven't reviewed the MindRDR and have no plans at this time to add it to the Glass apps Store.

Explore further: Health record app for Google Glass developed by Drchrono

More information: github.com/ThisPlace/MindRDR

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Health record app for Google Glass developed by Drchrono

Jun 15, 2014

The future of Google Glass in health care appears to be by now not a question of if but a question of where and when. Philips Healthcare, in its explorations into health care's future, created a video that ...

Facebook, Twitter announce apps for Google's Glass

May 17, 2013

Google says it's still figuring out the best ways to use Glass, but the company announced Thursday that Facebook, Twitter and several other media firms have built their own applications for the futuristic-looking wearable ...

Google resumes Glass sales in the US

May 14, 2014

Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine-tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact ...

Recommended for you

Ear-check via phone can ease path to diagnosis

Dec 18, 2014

Ear infections are common in babies and young children. That it is a frequent reason for young children's visit to doctors comes as no consolation for the parents of babies tugging at their ears and crying ...

Gift Guide: Home products come with connectivity

Dec 18, 2014

Do you really need an app to tell you to brush and floss? It seems every household appliance is getting some smarts these days, meaning some connection to a phone app and the broader Internet. But then what?

BlackBerry launches Classic in last-ditch effort

Dec 17, 2014

(AP)—BlackBerry is returning to its roots with a new phone that features a traditional keyboard at a time when rival Apple and Android phones—and most smartphone customers—have embraced touch screens.

Tag Heuer changes tune, now looking at smartwatches

Dec 16, 2014

Barely a few months after dismissing Apple's smartwatch, the new chief executive of luxury Swiss watchmaker Tag Heuer conceded Tuesday that such a hi-tech gadget might after all have a place in his firm's ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

antigoracle
5 / 5 (1) Jul 11, 2014
Eyedouche - I wonder if I look like a douche nozzle with this thing on my face.
MindRDR - Yes...yes you do.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.