Answers on link between injection wells and quakes

Jul 15, 2014 by Emily Schmall

States where hydraulic fracturing is taking place are experiencing unprecedented earthquake activity.

The drilling method involves sending high-pressure blasts of water, sand and chemicals into deep shale rock formations to free up oil and gas. The process produces millions of gallons of wastewater which operators send underground into .

Scientists are researching whether these injections are causing quakes.

A study published earlier this month in the journal Science suggests that just four injection wells in Oklahoma have caused about 20 percent of the quakes from the eastern border of Colorado to the Atlantic coast since 2008.

However, seismologists and the oil and gas industry stress that the number of earthquakes tied to injection wells is small relative to the thousands of wells in operation in recent decades.

Explore further: USGS says seven small earthquakes shake central Oklahoma

Journal reference: Science search and more info website

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Dr_toad
5 / 5 (2) Jul 15, 2014
129 words to say nothing. If she can get that number up into the thousands, I can see a career in politics for Ms. Schmall.
Jimee
5 / 5 (1) Jul 15, 2014
Who cares? I'm making money!
The Alchemist
3 / 5 (2) Jul 15, 2014
Also in recent news, Reagan defeats Carter by a landslide.

This kind of thing is why we haven't encountered intelligent life elsewhere in the universe:
Either 1. This kind of thing killed them off in a evolutionary eyeblink, or
2. They eroded their land into the sea, and electronics hate seawater.