Latest biodiversity information captured in new CSIRO book

July 16, 2014 by Fiona Brown
Front cover of the book ‘Biodiversity: Science and Solutions for Australia’ by CSIRO.

Capturing the latest information on Australia's biodiversity, the book aims to provide business, government, and the community with practical solutions to managing Australia's globally unique natural assets.

"This publication is an invaluable resource for anyone managing Australia's ecosystems. The book provides an important bridge from our scientists to the wider Australian community," said Minister Hunt.

Whether it's a precious cultural symbol, our life-support system, or a resource to be used – biodiversity matters to all Australians. Yet, despite our sense of its importance as part of our national identity, in many parts of our country biodiversity is in trouble.

"CSIRO's book draws together the latest science to identify practical solutions to the many challenges that face Australia's unique biodiversity, which include habitat fragmentation, altered fire regimes, invasive , harvesting of species, and species decline," said Dr Megan Clark, CSIRO Chief Executive.

"The book draws on CSIRO's 90 years of research into biodiversity, as well as insights from the broader community, including research organisations, industry, all levels of government and the wider community," said Dr Clark.

The book's 192 pages provide scientific insights including:

  • the ancient origins and unique features of Australia's species, as well as the current status of our biodiversity on land and in rivers, lakes and the sea.
  • tools for management and planning, including Australia's protected area system
  • Indigenous perspectives on biodiversity
  • how Australia's interacts with agriculture, the resources sector, and cities.

The book is available for free as an eBook from the CSIRO website and will be distributed to key decision makers around the country.

The printed version of the book has been produced on paper certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.

Explore further: Pollen research not be sniffed at

More information: Biodiversity: Science and Solutions for Australia can be downloaded for free here:

Related Stories

Pollen research not be sniffed at

November 29, 2011

Pollen may annoy allergy sufferers in springtime but, viewed under the microscope, a pollen grain is a thing of beauty. Amazing images and facts about pollen are part of an exhibition at CSIRO Discovery in Canberra beginning ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests fish can experience 'emotional fever'

November 25, 2015

(—A small team of researchers from the U.K. and Spain has found via lab study that at least one type of fish is capable of experiencing 'emotional fever,' which suggests it may qualify as a sentient being. In their ...

New gene map reveals cancer's Achilles heel

November 25, 2015

Scientists have mapped out the genes that keep our cells alive, creating a long-awaited foothold for understanding how our genome works and which genes are crucial in disease like cancer.

How cells in the developing ear 'practice' hearing

November 25, 2015

Before the fluid of the middle ear drains and sound waves penetrate for the first time, the inner ear cells of newborn rodents practice for their big debut. Researchers at Johns Hopkins report they have figured out the molecular ...

How cells 'climb' to build fruit fly tracheas

November 25, 2015

Fruit fly windpipes are much more like human blood vessels than the entryway to human lungs. To create that intricate network, fly embryonic cells must sprout "fingers" and crawl into place. Now researchers at The Johns Hopkins ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.