Fewer gas leaks found in cities with new pipes

Jul 16, 2014 by Seth Borenstein

A new study found that cities that regularly replace old natural gas lines don't leak as much methane as older cities who don't fix them.

Using a gas-sniffing device attached to Google's city-mapping cars and new calculations that determine rough leak rates, the Environmental Defense Fund measured in the streets of the three cities, Indianapolis, Boston and New York City's Staten Island. Methane is a potent global warming gas and leaks can be a safety hazard.

While Boston and Staten Island averaged one leak per each mile mapped, Indianapolis, where the public utility has replaced old pipes, had only one for every 200 miles mapped. And Boston and Staten Island leaks were more likely to be bigger, more than 2,000 cubic feet per day.

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User comments : 5

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SamB
5 / 5 (4) Jul 16, 2014
A new study found that cities that regularly replace old natural gas lines don't leak as much methane as older cities who don't fix them.

WOW.. Who would have thought, eh???
Imagine, newer pipes leak less than older pipes. What a breakthrough...
rockwolf1000
5 / 5 (1) Jul 17, 2014
Indeed.

Thank you Professor Obvious and Admiral Apparent.

Next study..... Does water make things wet?
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (2) Jul 17, 2014
The factor of 1:200 is rather surprising, though.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (1) Jul 17, 2014
"Next study..... Does water make things wet?"
Depends. Doesn't pure potassium ignite in water? Some chemical does...
A better question might be - do thoughts of Salma Hayek get you hot?

"The factor of 1:200 is rather surprising, though."
It is surprising. Those older pipes must have been there a LONG time. Or does the jointing degrade a lot faster...
rockwolf1000
5 / 5 (2) Jul 17, 2014
"Next study..... Does water make things wet?"
Depends. Doesn't pure potassium ignite in water? Some chemical does...


Only after it gets wet.

A better question might be - do thoughts of Salma Hayek get you hot?


Indeed she does!

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