Facebook lets users squirrel items away

July 21, 2014

Facebook on Monday began letting people squirrel away online tidbits such as links to chew on more thoroughly later.

"Now you can save items that you find on Facebook to check out later when you have more time," software engineer Daniel Giambalvo said in a blog post on the leading social network.

"You can save items like links, places, movies, TV and music."

The feature is being added as Facebook users increasingly connect with the social network from while on the go, with only snippets of time to explore Internet offerings.

Letting people save items for later scrutiny encourages people to return and spend more time on Facebook, increasing opportunities for the social network to cash in on money-making tools such as advertising.

California-based Facebook said users have the option of keeping saved items private or sharing them with friends via the social network.

The "Save" feature will be rolled out during the next few days to those using computer browsers or mobile devices powered by Apple of Android software, according to Giambalvo.

Explore further: Facebook allows collaborative online photo albums

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