ESA image: The eye of super typhoon Neoguri

Jul 09, 2014
Credit: ESA/NASA

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is sharing his incredible views from 400 km above on the International Space Station. In the last week the six astronauts witnessed Hurricane Arthur terrorise the US east coast, beautiful auroras and super typhoon Neoguri as it approached Japan.

At its height, Neoguri produced of 240 km/h and its eye, the centre of the typhoon, was 65 km wide. Thousands of people in Okinawa, Japan, and elsewhere were evacuated. The worst seems to be over, with Neoguri having been demoted  back to a 'normal' typhoon.

See more pictures of Earth through the eyes of Alexander Gerst on his Flickr page.

Explore further: NASA satellites see Neoguri grow into a super typhoon

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