A cool approach to flexible electronics

Jul 10, 2014
A cool approach to flexible electronics
Fully printed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) on a paper substrate. (a) Schematic of the device structure for a fully printed OTFT on paper. (b) Arrays of fully printed OTFTs fabricated on a paper substrate inkjet printed with the NIMS logo before adding the device. (c) An optical microscope image of fully-printed OTFT arrays. (d) A magnified optical microscope image of the individual device. Arrays of fully printed organic thin film transistors fabricated on paper substrates that had the the NIMS logo ink jet printed on before processing.

A nanoparticle ink that can be used for printing electronics without high-temperature annealing presents a possible profitable approach for manufacturing flexible electronics.

Printing is considered to provide low-cost high performance flexible electronics that outperforms the amorphous silicon currently limiting developments in display technology. However the nanoparticle inks developed so far have required annealing, which limits them to substrates that can withstand high temperatures, ruling out a lot of the flexible plastics that could otherwise be used. Researchers at the National Institute for Materials Science and Okayama University in Japan have now developed a nanoparticle ink that can be used with printing procedures.

Developments in thin film transistors made from have provided wider, thinner displays with higher resolution and lower energy consumption. However further progress in this field is now limited by the low response to applied electric fields, that is, the low field-effect mobility. Oxide semiconductors such as InGaZnO (IGZO) offer better performance characteristics but require complicated fabrication procedures.

Nanoparticle inks should allow simple low-cost manufacture but the usually used are surrounded in non-conductive ligands – molecules that are introduced during synthesis for stabilizing the particles. These ligands must be removed by annealing to make the ink conducting. Takeo Minari, Masayuki Kanehara and colleagues found a way around this difficulty by developing nanoparticles surrounded by planar aromatic molecules that allow charge transfer.

The gold nanoparticles had a resistivity of around 9 x 10-6 Ω cm – similar to pure gold. The researchers used the nanoparticle ink to print organic thin film transistors on a flexible polymer and a paper substrate at room temperature, producing devices with mobilities of 7.9 and 2.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 for polymer and paper respectively – figures comparable to IGZO devices.

As the researchers conclude in their report of the work, "This room temperature printing process is a promising method as a core technology for future semiconductor devices."

Explore further: Formation of organic thin-film transistors through room-temperature printing

More information: Minari, T., Kanehara, Y., Liu, C., Sakamoto, K., Yasuda, T., Yaguchi, A., Tsukada, S., Kashizaki, K. and Kanehara, M. (2014), "Room-Temperature Printing of Organic Thin-Film Transistors with π-Junction Gold Nanoparticles." Adv. Funct. Mater.. doi: 10.1002/adfm.201400169

Provided by International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Tough foam from tiny sheets

10 hours ago

Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice University.

Graphene surfaces on photonic racetracks

Jul 28, 2014

In an article published in Optics Express, scientists from The University of Manchester describe how graphene can be wrapped around a silicon wire, or waveguide, and modify the transmission of light through it.

Simulating the invisible

Jul 28, 2014

Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos in the OIST Nanoparticles by Design Unit simulates the interactions of particles that are too small to see, and too complicated to visualize. In order to study the particles' behavior, he uses ...

Building 'invisible' materials with light

Jul 28, 2014

A new method of building materials using light, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, could one day enable technologies that are often considered the realm of science fiction, such as invisibility ...

User comments : 0