BBC to launch online Thai news service after coup

Jul 09, 2014
People leave the BBC building in West London on March 21, 2005

The BBC said Wednesday it will launch a new social media service in Thailand to offer people another source of information at a time when the junta has imposed widespread censorship over domestic media.

The BBC World Service operation will cover local and international news in Thai and English for an initial period of three months, the British broadcaster said, launching on Facebook at 6.30 pm (1130 GMT) Thursday.

Thailand's military rulers have suspended democracy since seizing power on May 22, imposing martial law, banning public rallies and censoring the to stifle any dissent.

"One of the fundamental principles of the World Service is to bring impartial and accurate news and to countries when they lack it," Liliane Landor, head of language services at the BBC World Service, said in a statement.

"We think the time is right to trial a new Thai and English digital stream to bring trusted news and information to people inside Thailand."

Thai junta spokesman Werachon Sukondhapatipak said he was happy to help the BBC "better understand the situation in Thailand".

"We don't have any problem as long as they don't send any provocative information that is negative or impacts the stability of the country," he said.

Last month the junta said it would set up five panels to monitor national and international organisations as well as in its latest attempt to control the press.

The coup in Thailand follows years of political divisions between supporters of fugitive former Thai prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra and a royalist establishment backed by parts of the military and judiciary.

Explore further: Thai army says will block social media over critical content

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Thai Facebook users get censorship scare

May 28, 2014

Thailand's new military rulers said that a sudden interruption of access to Facebook on Wednesday was not part of a censorship policy, but due instead to a technical hitch.

Thai cyber police step up royal slur patrols

Jun 15, 2014

Thailand's military is bolstering its self-designated role as protector of the monarchy with increased "cyber patrols" to root out critics of the king following last month's coup.

China Mobile to take stake in Thailand's True

Jun 09, 2014

China Mobile Ltd. has agreed to buy an 18 percent stake in Thai telecommunications and cable TV company True Corp. for $880 million, the highest profile corporate deal announced in Thailand since the military sized power ...

Thailand gives radar data 10 days after plane lost (Update)

Mar 18, 2014

Thailand's military said Tuesday that its radar detected a plane that may have been Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 just minutes after the jetliner's communications went down, and that it didn't share the information with Malaysia ...

Recommended for you

Facebook dressed down over 'real names' policy

Sep 17, 2014

Facebook says it temporarily restored hundreds of deleted profiles of self-described drag queens and others, but declined to change a policy requiring account holders to use their real names rather than drag names such as ...

Yelp to pay US fine for child privacy violation

Sep 17, 2014

Online ratings operator Yelp agreed to pay $450,000 to settle US charges that it illegally collected data on children, in violation of privacy laws, officials said Wednesday.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

wealthychef
not rated yet Jul 09, 2014
So this is fine, uncovering the secrets of the government of Thailand against their laws, but Snowden is a criminal?