17th century shipwreck on the move in Texas

Jul 17, 2014 by Michael Graczyk

A famed French explorer's ship that sank off the coast of Texas more than three centuries ago is on the move again.

The preserved keel and other large pieces of Rene-Robert Cavelier Sieur de la Salle's , La Belle, have been loaded onto a flat-bed truck at a Texas A&M University lab for transfer to the state museum in Austin, about 85 miles to the west.

It's the final stop in a voyage that began in 1685 with the explorer's ill-fated expedition to find the mouth of the Mississippi River. The ship sank in a storm, La Salle was killed by his own men and the French were unable to colonize what is now Texas.

The wreck was discovered about two decades ago and retrieved by archaeologists.

Explore further: Explorer says Griffin shipwreck may be found

4.5 /5 (4 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Explorer says Griffin shipwreck may be found

Jun 24, 2014

A debris field at the bottom of Lake Michigan may be the remains of the long-lost Griffin, a vessel commanded by a 17th-century French explorer, said a shipwreck hunter who has sought the wreckage for decades.

Wooden beam could be detached part of shipwreck

Jun 19, 2013

A wooden beam that has long been the focus of the search for a 17th century shipwreck in northern Lake Michigan was not attached to a buried vessel as searchers had suspected, but still may have come from the elusive Griffin ...

Divers begin Lake Michigan search for Griffin ship

Jun 16, 2013

Divers began opening an underwater pit Saturday at a remote site in northern Lake Michigan that they say could be the resting place of the Griffin, a ship commanded by the 17th century French explorer La ...

Possible shipwreck artifact to get CT scan for age

Aug 22, 2013

Explorers who removed a wooden slab from Lake Michigan this summer are taking an unusual step to determine whether it could have come from the Griffin, a long-lost vessel from the 17th century.

Recommended for you

New evidence on Neanderthal mixing

23 hours ago

New research on a 45,000-year-old Siberian thighbone has narrowed the window of time when humans and Neanderthals interbred to between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago, and has shown that modern humans reached ...

User comments : 0