17th century shipwreck on the move in Texas

July 17, 2014 by Michael Graczyk

A famed French explorer's ship that sank off the coast of Texas more than three centuries ago is on the move again.

The preserved keel and other large pieces of Rene-Robert Cavelier Sieur de la Salle's , La Belle, have been loaded onto a flat-bed truck at a Texas A&M University lab for transfer to the state museum in Austin, about 85 miles to the west.

It's the final stop in a voyage that began in 1685 with the explorer's ill-fated expedition to find the mouth of the Mississippi River. The ship sank in a storm, La Salle was killed by his own men and the French were unable to colonize what is now Texas.

The wreck was discovered about two decades ago and retrieved by archaeologists.

Explore further: Divers begin Lake Michigan search for Griffin ship

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