Wind turbine payback

Jun 16, 2014

US researchers have carried out an environmental lifecycle assessment of 2-megawatt wind turbines mooted for a large wind farm in the US Pacific Northwest. Writing in the International Journal of Sustainable Manufacturing, they conclude that in terms of cumulative energy payback, or the time to produce the amount of energy required of production and installation, a wind turbine with a working life of 20 years will offer a net benefit within five to eight months of being brought online.

Wind turbines are frequently touted as the answer to sustainable electricity production especially if coupled to high-capacity storage for times when the wind speed is either side of their working range. They offer a power source that has essentially zero carbon emissions.

Coupled lifecycle cost and environmental assessment in terms of energy use and emissions of manufacturing, installation, maintenance and turbine end-of-life processing seems to be limited in the discussions for and against these devices. "All forms of energy generation require the conversion of natural resource inputs, which are attendant with environmental impacts and costs that must be quantified to make appropriate energy system development decisions," explain Karl Haapala and Preedanood Prempreeda of Oregon State University, in Corvallis.

The pair has carried out a (LCA) of 2MW in order to identify the net of the production and use of such devices for . An LCA takes into account sourcing of key raw materials (steel, copper, fiberglass, plastics, concrete, and other materials), transport, manufacturing, installation of the turbine, ongoing maintenance through its anticipated two decades of useful life and, finally, the impacts of recycling and disposal at end-of-life.

Their analysis shows that the vast majority of predicted environmental impacts would be caused by materials production and manufacturing processes. However, the payback for the associated energy use is within about 6 months, the team found. It is likely that even in a worst case scenario, lifetime energy requirements for each turbine will be subsumed by the first year of active use. Thus, for the 19 subsequent years, each turbine will, in effect, power over 500 households without consuming electricity generated using conventional sources.

Explore further: GE has surgical technique to power up wind blades

More information: Haapala, K.R. and Prempreeda, P. (2014) 'Comparative life cycle assessment of 2.0 MW wind turbines', Int. J. Sustainable Manufacturing, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp.170-185.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

GE has surgical technique to power up wind blades

May 27, 2014

Wind turbines continue to draw interest as a promising renewable energy source. Engineers are still addressing challenges, nonetheless, over how to ensure wind power becomes a more viable energy source making ...

Dutch company launches new-generation urban wind turbines

May 28, 2014

Could a new generation of wind turbines on residential rooftops be on the way? Saying no might be easy when imagining blade noise, if nothing else. The idea of wind turbines for generating energy in households ...

Recycling wind turbines

Sep 21, 2007

The development of wind power promises much in terms of providing us with renewable energy for the future and wind turbines could be the most effective way to harness that power. Danish researchers now suggest that in order ...

Recommended for you

Image: Testing electric propulsion

11 hours ago

On Aug. 19, National Aviation Day, a lot of people are reflecting on how far aviation has come in the last century. Could this be the future – a plane with many electric motors that can hover like a helicopter ...

Where's the real value in Tesla's patent pledge?

12 hours ago

With the much-anticipated arrival next month of electric vehicle manufacturer Tesla's Model S to Australian shores, it's a good time to revisit Tesla's pledge to freely share patents. ...

New type of solar concentrator doesn't block the view

Aug 19, 2014

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through ...

Asian inventions dominate energy storage systems

Aug 19, 2014

In recent years, the number of patent applications for electrochemical energy storage technologies has soared. According to a study by the Technical University Munich, the largest volume of applications is ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gardenworksllc
not rated yet Jun 16, 2014
I suppose if it truly pays itself back in such an astonishing way, the companies that install them would be doing so at a feverish pace. This would not only be for the good of humanity, but also to support their bottom line as a company. But wait...they aren't because the gov't didn't renew the free money to actually make them profitable, so now they don't want to install these ridiculous monstrosities. I'm shocked. Gee..can we please get some turbines that actually pay for themselves, like the vertical turbines? They produce power at much lower speeds, don't kill stuff, don't produce low frequency sound, you can't see them above trees,etc. Why?,Why? I thought the world was ending any day from AGW? Why wouldn't we use the the things that actually work? Thanks GE