Smithsonian asks judge's help with bug collection

Jun 12, 2014 by Jessica Gresko

Entomologist Carl J. Drake spent his life studying bugs. When he died in 1965, he left his life savings and his vast insect collection to the Smithsonian. But now Drake's will has become something of a pest.

The Smithsonian Institution says that after nearly half a century, it's having difficulty carrying out the wishes Drake spelled out in his will. That includes fulfilling the mission he gave the institution for his money: buy more . That's why the Smithsonian is asking a in Washington for permission to modify Drake's will.

The Smithsonian says it's only had to ask to modify a will once or twice in the last half century and that it wants to use Drake's money not just to purchase insects but also to buy supplies and to support .

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