Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico

Jun 09, 2014 by Rob Gutro

System 90L was an area of tropical low pressure that never managed to form into a tropical depression during its lifetime, but did drop heavy rainfall on eastern and southeastern Mexico before dissipating. NOAA's GOES-East satellite data captured the end of System 90L's life as it made landfall and dissipated.

On June 7, there was good and bad news about System 90L. The good news was that it moved further inland and was dissipating so it no longer had a chance to develop into a tropical cyclone. The bad news was that it moved further inland and continued to produce gusty winds and along with life-threatening flash flooding over eastern and southeastern Mexico.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, the NASA/NOAA GOES Project created an animation of satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery. The movie shows the movement of System 90L over land and dissipating between June 6 and June 7 at 2000 UTC (4 p.m. EDT).

The Mexican Weather Service reported the city of Veracruz recorded 7.1 inches (180 mm) of rain! Huixtepec in Oaxaca reported 2.9 inches (73.4 mm) of rain.

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This movie of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of System 90L over land and dissipating between June 6 and June 7 at 2000 UTC (4 p.m. EDT). Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

On June 7, the National Hurricane Center noted that the low was centered near 18.0 north and 96.5 west. By June 9, System 90L had dissipated.

Explore further: NASA's TRMM satellite analyzes Mexico's soaking tropical rains

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