Montana to notify 1.3 million of computer hacking

Jun 24, 2014 by Lisa Baumann

Montana officials are notifying 1.3 million people that their personal information could have been accessed by hackers who broke into a state health department computer server.

The letters are going to people whose information and records were on the server. Officials said Tuesday there's no evidence any information was stolen, but they're offering free credit monitoring and identity-fraud insurance to all 1.3 million people.

Only about 1 million people live in Montana. The notifications are going to residents, people who no longer live in Montana, and the estates of those who died.

Montana Chief Information Officer Ron Baldwin says malware was discovered on the health agency's server May 22. The server contained names, addresses, birthdates, Social Security numbers, and birth and death certificate information.

Officials say security has since been updated.

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