Clean and green litter machine will cut carbon emissions

June 18, 2014 by Clair Keleher

The University of Queensland's new outdoor cleaning solution, the 'Glutton', is a dust-, noise- and exhaust-free litter vacuum that will reduce the University's carbon emissions by approximately four tonnes each year.

The vacuum operates on batteries recharged during daylight hours by solar renewable energy generated from UQ's solar photovoltaic panels.

The fully-electric machine efficiently vacuums up a variety of waste types from and butts to dead leaves and even a full bottle of soft drink.

Property and Facilities Division Deputy Director Geoff Dennis said the Glutton was one of a number of measures to help reduce UQ's .

"This new litter vacuum will replace the traditional leaf blowers to ensure we continue to keep the grounds clean, but without having a major impact on the environment," he said.

"The environmental savings will contribute to UQ's commitment to embedding sustainability across all aspects of the University," he said.

UQ Cleaning Manager Leigh Burgess said the Glutton enhanced the University's cleaning requirements.

"As well as complementing the University's sustainability program, the Glutton is considerably less noisy than traditional leaf blowers, which is a big plus for the University as cleaning often takes place during teaching hours," she said.

"The Glutton also reduces air pollution due to its air filtration system and it doesn't eject dust or exhaust into the atmosphere."

"The Glutton delivers on these goals without sacrificing performance."

The Property and Facilities Division approved the purchase of the Glutton through UQ's cleaning contractor Spotless, as an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional leaf blowers.

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