New field guide for Africa's mammalian Eden

June 10, 2014
"Field Guide to Larger Mammals of Tanzania" contains 135 species, checklist for every national park. Credit: WCS

From the kipunji – a secretive primate species first discovered by WCS in 2003 to the Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin, Tanzania is known for its staggering variety of large mammals including the largest diversity of primates in mainland Africa.

A new field guide authored by conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, and the Zoological Society of London documents this dazzling array of . Called "A Field Guide to Larger Mammals of Tanzania" the new guide chronicles all the larger mammals of Tanzania, including marine mammals and newly discovered species.

Authors include Charles Foley, assistant country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society in Tanzania; Lara Foley, program manager of the Wildlife Conservation Society's Tarangire Elephant Project; Alex Lobora, senior research officer at the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute; Daniela De Luca, senior scientist for the Wildlife Conservation Society's conservation programs in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania and Zanzibar, Maurus Msuha, head of wildlife information and education at the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute; Tim Davenport is country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society in Tanzania; and Sarah Durant, senior research fellow at the Zoological Society of London's Institute of Zoology.

Tanzania is Home to the Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Crater, and Mount Kilimanjaro and offers some of the finest big game watching in the world, from elephants and rhinos to chimpanzees and lions.

Said co-author Tim Davenport: "As well as compiling all historical information, this new guide book is the culmination of our collective 100 years in the bush in Tanzania. We hope it will be of value to safari-goers, natural historians and conservationists alike."

WCS Executive Director for Africa Programs James Deutsch called the book: "The much awaited, much needed, definitive to the mammals of the most important country in the world for seeing and conserving wildlife."

Detailed accounts are provided for more than 135 species, along with color photos, color illustrations of marine mammals, and distribution maps. Accounts for land species give information on identification, subspecies, similar species, ecology, behavior, distribution, conservation status, and where best to see each species.

In addition, the guide features plates with side-by-side photographic comparisons of species that are easily confused, as well as first-time-ever checklists for every national park.

Explore further: No place like home: Africa's big cats show postcode preference

More information: press.princeton.edu/titles/10225.html

Related Stories

New snake species announced

January 9, 2012

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced the discovery of a spectacularly colored snake from a remote area of Tanzania in East Africa.

Study confirms wealth of primates in Tanzania

July 17, 2013

A five-year study by the Wildlife Conservation Society gives new hope to some of the world's most endangered primates by establishing a roadmap to protect all 27 species in Tanzania – the most primate-diverse country in ...

Fences cause 'ecological meltdown'

April 3, 2014

The use of fenced areas to protect threatened species in the wild should be a last resort, argue scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

Recommended for you

Genomes uncover life's early history

August 24, 2015

A University of Manchester scientist is part of a team which has carried out one of the biggest ever analyses of genomes on life of all forms.

Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in three decades

August 25, 2015

In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers ...

Study shows female frogs susceptible to 'decoy effect'

August 28, 2015

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers has found that female túngaras, frogs that live in parts of Mexico and Central and South America, appear to be susceptible to the "decoy effect." In their paper published in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.