Feds to nix wind-farm penalties for eagle deaths

Jun 26, 2014 by Scott Smith

A deal with federal officials will make a California wind farm the first in the nation to avoid prosecution if eagles are injured or die when they run into the giant turning blades.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday the Shiloh IV Wind Project, 60 miles east of San Francisco, will receive a special permit allowing accidental harm to up to five eagles over five years.

Agency Director Daniel Ashe says the permit encourages development of while requiring the company to help protect eagles.

Ashe says it will move California toward its goal of producing one-third of its energy from renewable sources by 2020.

Conservationists sued the Obama administration this month over the permit, arguing the government failed to evaluate the consequences to .

Explore further: Lawsuit: Extending eagle death permits illegal

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