Drone access to US skies faces significant hurdles (Update)

Jun 30, 2014 by Joan Lowy
In this photo June 7, 2014, photo released by BP Alaska, Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) technology using an AeroVironment Puma drone is given a pre-flight checkout in preparation for flights by BP at its Prudhoe Bay, Alaska operations. The Federal Aviation Administration granted the first permission for commercial drone flights over land, the latest effort by the agency to show it is loosening restrictions on commercial uses of the unmanned aircraft. The federal effort to provide drones regular access to U.S. skies faces significant hurdles and won't meet a September 2015 deadline set by Congress, said a report released June 30 by a government watchdog. A report by the Transportation Department's inspector general says the Federal Aviation Administration hasn't figured out what kind of technology unmanned aircraft should use to avoid crashing into other planes. (AP Photo/BP Alaska)

The federal effort to provide drones regular access to U.S. skies faces significant hurdles and will not meet a September 2015 deadline set by Congress, a government watchdog said Monday.

Despite years of research, the Federal Aviation Administration hasn't figured out what kind of technology unmanned aircraft should use to avoid crashing into other planes and to prevent lost links with ground control stations, Matthew Hampton, the Transportation Department's assistant inspector general for aviation, said in a report.

The FAA also hasn't set standards for certifying the safety of drone designs and manufacture like those that exist for manned aircraft, the report said. Nor has the agency developed standard procedures for air traffic controllers to guide drones. There is no adequate program for training controllers how manage unmanned aircraft. And criteria for training "pilots" who remotely control drones from the ground have yet to be developed.

Until the FAA resolves these problems and others, the effort to integrate drones into the national airspace "will continue to move at a slow pace, and safety risks will remain," the report said.

FAA officials, defending the agency's record, said in a statement that despite the inspector general's findings the FAA "has made significant progress" toward giving drones wider access to U.S. skies "even as it dealt with disruptions" due to automatic, government-wide spending cuts and a three-week partial government shutdown.

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wealthychef
1 / 5 (1) Jun 30, 2014
This is the wrong way to go forward, waiting for Congress of all people to figure out how to make it work. Simply allow it to happen, with stiff penalties for screwing up, including jail time for people who cause injuries or damage with their drones. Technology will happen.
Yohaku
5 / 5 (1) Jun 30, 2014
The problem is that the FAA wants them to be like private planes, so they can regulate them out of the sky, like they have almost done to private planes. The fear that a drone will take down a Boing 777 and crash it into a shopping mall on Christmas Eve, has frozen the FAA solid.