Researchers to expand child exploitation web-crawler

Jun 03, 2014 by Richard Frank
Richard Frank

Researchers in Simon Fraser University's International Cybercrime Research Centre are expanding their Child Exploitation Network Extractor (CENE)—an online "web crawler" that identifies and tracks child exploitation networks online—to determine where networks are located.

They've secured a grant from the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) through its inaugural Community Investment Program. It's one of 28 projects shortlisted from 149 submissions to share more than $1 million in funding.

CIRA seeks to build a stronger internet in Canada by providing funding to community groups, not-for-profits and academic institutions for projects deemed to enhance the internet for the benefit of all Canadians.

At present, CENE enables researchers to track online child-exploitation (CE) networks—a series of websites that are hyperlinked through URLs and lead consumers of CE from one website to another.

Using the , researchers can download webpages and recursively follow their links while collecting statistics on the content, keywords, images and videos.

"This allows for automatic identification of sites that contain CE content, without having users to view the content," says CENE's co-developer Richard Frank, an assistant professor in SFU's School of Criminology. "Through collaborations with the RCMP, their database of CE-image identifiers was integrated into CENE, allowing CENE to detect known CE images."

Previous research in online CE was aimed at developing and testing CENE to collect data on websites that disseminate CE content. Researchers found it was possible to map the networks of CE websites—a measure called "network capital"—and take into account both the harmful nature of website content and their connectivity.

They also discovered that "bridges" between otherwise unconnected parts of the network lead to the most damage, and that many of the millions of images seized by the RCMP can still be found on openly accessible websites.

"Although we can identify these websites, we cannot identify where they are," explains Frank. "This deficiency was pointed out by the RCMP in discussions concerning the next steps, as the agency is primarily concerned with illegal content within its own jurisdiction that it can directly act on."

With CIRA funding, researchers will extend CENE in two critical ways. They will add a "geolocation" capability into CENE that would enable it to determine the approximate physical location of the server. This would be accomplished through the use of a third-party service or an "ip2location" database.

CENE will also be able to look up the registered owner of the domain to identify the registered location of the owner. This could be accomplished by services offered by CIRA.

Frank says once CENE becomes location-aware, researchers will focus on the global distribution of CE content and registered owners to identify the countries where the content is hosted.

Meanwhile Canadian websites will be analyzed by comparing their structure, survival and content to websites not located in Canada, and determine their relative importance globally.

Explore further: Web crawler takes virtual bite out of cybercrime

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Web crawler takes virtual bite out of cybercrime

Mar 04, 2014

Simon Fraser University researcher Richard Frank is helping to take a virtual bite out of cybercrime. His web crawler, designed to track websites that exploit children, will be among the School of Criminology's demonstrations ...

Web crawler takes aim at child exploitation

Nov 24, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers at Simon Fraser University’s International Cybercrime Research Centre hope a tool they’ve developed to track websites that exploit children can help police better investigate the crime.

Recommended for you

Chameleon: Cloud computing for computer science

Aug 26, 2014

Cloud computing has changed the way we work, the way we communicate online, even the way we relax at night with a movie. But even as "the cloud" starts to cross over into popular parlance, the full potential ...

User comments : 0