A hundred ways to sustain grasslands and ranchers now at your fingertips: New online tool

May 08, 2014
This is the grasslands beneficial management practices online tool. Credit: CEC

A new online tool is being launched today with nearly 100 beneficial management practices aimed at ranchers, conservation organizations, government and academic institutions in North America. Ranging from local techniques to national and continental approaches, the tool contains a wealth of practical and innovative ideas for conserving and restoring native grasslands and boosting the economic stability of ranchers.

To access the , visit: http://www.cec.org/grasslands.

North America's grasslands—and the species that inhabit them—are coming under increasing pressure from climate change, residential development, oil and gas extraction, and the expansion of cash crop production. As one of the most sustainable forms of agriculture, ranching has the potential to conserve remaining , restore degraded landscapes, and reverse the loss of North America's most threatened terrestrial ecoregion.

With the , ranching and stewardship best practices can be searched geographically or thematically according to eight management categories, such as Grazing Management, Water Resource Management and Invasive Species and Pest Management. The tool also contains a "Featured Stories" section, with inspiring examples of ranchers across the continent who are using these techniques to conserve grasslands and improve their economic bottom line. In the tool's "Overarching Practices" section, high-level guidance is offered to assist ranchers, conservationists, and policy makers in making sound management decisions that achieve both economic and conservation objectives. Available in English, French and Spanish, the tool also features a glossary of terms and a resources section.

"The online tool contains cutting-edge grasslands conservation and management practices and captures the technical knowledge gained over generations by across the continent," said Karen Richardson, Program Manager for Terrestrial and Marine Ecosystems, Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). "We encourage users to send us additional publications and case studies to expand the online tool and make it a truly dynamic and continental product."

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
Take a tour of the website and learn how to use it by watching this short tutorial

The CEC would like as many North Americans as possible to have access to this tool, so please feel free to embed it or link to http://www.nagrasslands.org on your personal or institutional website.

Explore further: Agroforestry systems can repair degraded watersheds

Provided by Commission for Environmental Cooperation

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Using fire to manage fire-prone regions around the world

Aug 14, 2013

The Ecological Society of America's first online-only Special Issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment showcases prescribed burns around the globe, some of them drawing on historical practices to man ...

Tropical grassy ecosystems under threat

Mar 13, 2014

(Phys.org) —Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that tropical grassy areas, which play a critical role in the world's ecology, are under threat as a result of ineffective management.

Recommended for you

Invasive lionfish likely safe to eat after all

1 hour ago

Scientists have learned that recent fears of invasive lionfish causing fish poisoning may be unfounded. If so, current efforts to control lionfish by fishing derbies and targeted fisheries may remain the ...

Brother of Hibiscus is found alive and well on Maui

18 hours ago

Most people are familiar with Hibiscus flowers- they are an iconic symbol of tropical resorts worldwide where they are commonly planted in the landscape. Some, like Hawaii's State Flower- Hibiscus brackenridgei- are en ...

Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares

20 hours ago

While previous studies have shown that marine noise can affect animal movement and communication, with unknown ecological consequences, scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter and the École Pratique des Hautes ...

User comments : 0