VW announces dual clutch automatic 10-speed transmission for its automotive vehicles

May 14, 2014 by Bob Yirka report

Volkswagen development chief Heinz-Jakob Neusser has announced at the ongoing International Motor Symposium, in Vienna, Austria, that the company is set to debut a world first 10 speed automatic transmission, which should VW Group Chairman Dr. Martin Winterkorn, boasted, help the company meet its goal of increasing mileage across its line of vehicles by 20 percent over the next several years.

As automakers continue to seek new ways to improve they have stretched the bounds of conventional thinking, in some cases using new exotic light materials, in others, adding more gears to the transmission. Doing so allows the car or truck to make the most efficient use of the power coming from the engine. Anyone who has ridden a multi-speed bicycle can attest to the energy savings when traveling long distances, or attempting to ride faster than those on an old-fashioned single gear bike.

The company plans to use the new transmission on virtually its entire line of vehicles, which has grown in recent years as the company has purchased brands such as Bentley, Porsche, Audi, Lamborghini and Bugatti. The new transmission will be capable, company reps said, of withstanding torque up to 369-pound feet, which means it should work in powerful cars such as VW's Golf R 400. The new transmission will also work in both all wheel and front wheel drive vehicles and in both longitudinal and transverse engine layouts in four, six or eight cylinder configurations.

The specifics of the new transmission have not yet been released, but reps for the company said it has been designed to work with the company's MQB modular-transversal architecture, which has moved slowly to most of the company's vehicles. Other car makers have announced vehicles with higher gear speeds, with many expected to release nine-speed configurations, leaving VW as the only one with ten.

VW also announced at the symposium, the development of a 235bph diesel engine—with just four cylinders it would make a good match for the new , likely offering very high mileage. Dubbed the EA288, it will have dual turbo-chargers, delivering a full 280 horse power—a likely candidate for the next generation Passat.

Explore further: Volkswagen XL1: 'World's most efficient car' makes its US debut

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User comments : 12

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BSD
2.3 / 5 (3) May 14, 2014
Pity the figures quoted in the article weren't in the original Metric measurements.

This is a science forum after all.
Caliban
not rated yet May 14, 2014

"...VW announces dual clutch automatic 10-speed transmission for its automotive vehicles..."


Wait --I'm ever so confused-- Does VW make any non-automotive vehicles?
Lex Talonis
2.6 / 5 (5) May 14, 2014
@BSD - yes it's "The Stupid Fucking American Effect.....

People (use metric) in Germany (metric country) create gearboxes (using metric designing gear and components) to go behind an engine (output in metric) and they send out a press release that some how in the USA gets the imperial treatment, and then the stupid cunts publish it in a SCIENCE journal (news aggregation site?) with the imperial measurements, which goes out into a world that aside from the 5% of the worlds population in the USA, that use almost exclusively METRIC.

Shakescene21
3 / 5 (4) May 15, 2014
If you metric blowhards really can't understand horsepower, then go read VW's German site. VW's market research has made them realize they can sell more cars in America if they speak the same language as most of their American customers.

(FYI, 1 horsepower equals 746 watts.)
alfie_null
5 / 5 (1) May 15, 2014
@BSD - yes it's "The Stupid Fucking American Effect.....

People (use metric) in Germany (metric country) create gearboxes (using metric designing gear and components) to go behind an engine (output in metric) and they send out a press release that some how in the USA gets the imperial treatment, and then the stupid cunts publish it in a SCIENCE journal (news aggregation site?) with the imperial measurements, which goes out into a world that aside from the 5% of the worlds population in the USA, that use almost exclusively METRIC.

Compounding that, a lack of care or understanding about accuracy. The source might just as well have expressed that "369 pound-feet" as 368.78107 foot-pounds. Which is an egregiously over-precise way of expressing 500 Nm. When a figure is obviously rounded, subsequently imbuing it with more accuracy does everyone a disservice. Please, just leave the units (imperial or metric) alone.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) May 15, 2014
Wait --I'm ever so confused-- Does VW make any non-automotive vehicles?

Looks like a translation SNAFU. I guess they mean their cars (as opposed to their heavy-duty vehicle and bus sections which require a bit more torque)

If you metric blowhards really can't understand horsepower, then go read VW's German site

While we do use the metric system in germany, horespower still is the measure for car power (alongside kW...but most customers in germany would be confused if they'd drop the horsepower value alltogether in ads)
Doug_Huffman
5 / 5 (3) May 15, 2014
The technically literate should be able to grasp the magnitude of a unit in what ever language it is expressed and convert it at will.

Cars are sold by horsepower but driven by torque.

About the DSG, it will be a blast to have/drive it it can be made reliable and robust. I've driven a Touareg TDI DSG 4WD to burn rubber in all six gears. Unfortunately the large TDI's are losers for the Tier III emissions controls.

My ALH TDI does an honest 50 mpg.
Eikka
not rated yet May 18, 2014
Cars are sold by horsepower but driven by torque.


In a revolving engine, one cannot exist without the other. The faster you go, the more horsepower you need to maintain that torque.

That's why an engine with high torque but low power would be useless in a car. It would stop accelerating before it reaches any appreciable speed.
Lex Talonis
not rated yet May 19, 2014
But dear Eikka, that is what gear boxes are for.

Fool.

mzso
not rated yet May 20, 2014
If you metric blowhards really can't understand horsepower, then go read VW's German site. VW's market research has made them realize they can sell more cars in America if they speak the same language as most of their American customers.

(FYI, 1 horsepower equals 746 watts.)


On the other hand stupid footpounds are unfamiliar and meaningless to anyone outside US.
Eikka
not rated yet May 20, 2014
"But dear Eikka, that is what gear boxes are for."

Gearboxes don't produce power.

Torque equals power divided by angular velocity. Doesn't matter how much gears you put in between, you just run out of "go" if you have no power.

mzso
not rated yet May 20, 2014
Why mess with 10 gear crap? It's getting ridiculous. Why not use CVT?