Video: What are stars?

May 15, 2014 by Akila Jeeson-Daniel, The Conversation

How are stars formed? What are they made of? And what happens to them when they die?

In this week's TCTV, astrophysicist Akila Jeeson-Daniel explains the physics behind the balls of gas that light up the .

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Explore further: Dung beetles use stars for orientation

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