Joystick sets record price for space collectibles

May 23, 2014

The price of space junk inched closer to the moon on Friday after a hand controller from the Apollo 15 mission sold at auction for $610,063—an apparent new record.

The joystick assembly from the fourth US manned was snapped up by an online bidder whose identity was not disclosed by RR Auction, a Massachusetts auction house specializing in rare collectibles.

"It's believed to be the most ever paid, at a public auction at least, for a piece of a NASA spacecraft," Robert Pearlman, founder of the space history and memorabilia website collectSPACE.com, told AFP.

The spring-loaded hand controller with attached cable previously belonged to Apollo 15 commander David Scott, who removed it as a souvenir from the lunar landing module prior to the 1971 mission's return to Earth.

Experts see the price of space collectibles trending ever higher—not least because there are currently no more , apart from sojourns in the International Space Station.

Other items sold by RR Auction included an optical alignment sight from the Scott collection that went for $126,179 and a glove worn by astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the historic Apollo 11 mission that fetched $61,212.

Explore further: Apollo 11 checklist, spacesuit sold at NY auction

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA's Apollo 13 checklist sells for $390,000

Nov 30, 2011

A checklist used to guide the wounded Apollo 13 spacecraft home after the explosion that led to the famed "Houston, we've had a problem" call sold at auction in Texas Wednesday for just under $390,000.

Recommended for you

Orion on track at T MINUS 1 Week to first blastoff

11 hours ago

At T MINUS 1 Week on this Thanksgiving Holiday, all launch processing events remain on track for the first blast off of NASA's new Orion crew vehicle on Dec. 4, 2014 which marks the first step on the long ...

Bad weather delays Japan asteroid probe lift off

18 hours ago

Bad weather will delay the launch of a Japanese space probe on a six-year mission to mine a distant asteroid, just weeks after a European spacecraft's historic landing on a comet captivated the world.

Manchester scientists boost NASA's missions to Mars

Nov 27, 2014

Computer Scientists from The University of Manchester have boosted NASA space missions by pioneering a global project to develop programs that efficiently test and control NASA spacecraft.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.