Inmarsat offers global airline tracking service after MH370

May 12, 2014
A crew member looks out an observation window aboard a Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P3 Orion maritime search aircraft as it flies over the southern Indian Ocean looking for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on April 11, 2014

British satellite operator Inmarsat said Monday it was offering a basic tracking service to all the world's passenger airlines free of charge, following the disappearance of Malaysian Airways flight MH370.

Inmarsat, which has played a role in the search for the missing plane, said the service it was offering would provide definitive positional information.

It will allow a plane to determine its location using GPS and send that data over Inmarsat's global network at 15-minute intervals.

While GPS (Global Positioning System) is commonplace in cars and mobile phones, the international air traffic control network is still almost entirely based on radar.

Rupert Pearce, CEO of Inmarsat, said that in the wake of the loss of flight MH370, which disappeared without a trace on March 8 during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board, it was "simply the right thing to do" to provide a free service.

In the so far fruitless search for the Malaysian jet, electronic pings from Inmarsat equipment on the lost plane led investigators to search for wreckage in the Indian Ocean.

Inmarsat said it would also offer a "black box in the sky" service under which a plane that had deviated off course—which is believed to be the case with MH370—could transmit historic and real-time information from the and .

More than two months since MH370 disappeared, no wreckage has been found to even confirm a crash, despite teams scouring sites in the Indian Ocean.

Explore further: Malaysia assessing possible plane wreckage claim (Update)

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User comments : 9

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rockwolf1000
3 / 5 (2) May 12, 2014
Fantastic idea! I don't see why this company has to offer the service for free though. The airlines have lots of money and the costs associated with searching for MH370 must be astronomical.

Who pays for the search?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!
xponen
1 / 5 (2) May 12, 2014
@rockwolf1000 your comment sound disgusting.

It was free because "it was "simply the right thing to do""

I'm soo disappointed to have read a comment that meant nothing, which questioned silly thing. I expect to learn something, not pre-occupied with the thought of how silly that comment were... :(
Sinister1812
not rated yet May 12, 2014
I'm not sure that the plane crashed. There's nothing to suggest that it did (no distress call/beacon, no debris, no black box found). If it did crash, they're looking in all the wrong places.

The plane is missing. And no one knows what happened?
rockwolf1000
2.5 / 5 (2) May 12, 2014
@ xponen "the simple"

@rockwolf1000 your comment sound disgusting.

It was free because "it was "simply the right thing to do""

I'm soo disappointed to have read a comment that meant nothing, which questioned silly thing. I expect to learn something, not pre-occupied with the thought of how silly that comment were... :(


Then perhaps you should learn to read you stupid retard.

It is the right thing to do. I just don't think this company should bear the financial burden alone, and the airlines should not be treated as a charity case.

Before you go around criticizing other people, perhaps you should work on your god awful reading comprehension, your terrible grammar and your atrocious spelling you dormant simpleton.

The number one problem with this world is that even idiots like you are allowed to have an opinion.
xponen
not rated yet May 17, 2014
@rockwolf1000
Fantastic idea! I don't see why this company has to offer the service for free though. The airlines have lots of money and the costs associated with searching for MH370 must be astronomical.

Who pays for the search?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

Your comment is bad because:
a) the effected airline has marginal profit
b) the effected airline was subsidized by the government (they own most of the stakes)
c) the effected airline's government was a third world nation.
d) the third world nation paid the search cost (with help from neighboring nation, such as China, Japan, Australia, Vietnam lending ships and airplane).
rockwolf1000
not rated yet May 20, 2014
@rockwolf1000
Fantastic idea! I don't see why this company has to offer the service for free though. The airlines have lots of money and the costs associated with searching for MH370 must be astronomical.

Who pays for the search?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

Your comment is bad because:
a) the effected airline has marginal profit
b) the effected airline was subsidized by the government (they own most of the stakes)
c) the effected airline's government was a third world nation.
d) the third world nation paid the search cost (with help from neighboring nation, such as China, Japan, Australia, Vietnam lending ships and airplane).

So What? Most of the passengers were from China. Air travel is elective 99.9% of the time, therefore all the costs should be borne by the passenger's via the airline. Why should taxpayers who never fly contribute to air travel searches or safety concerns?
rockwolf1000
not rated yet May 20, 2014

Your comment is bad because:
a) the effected airline has marginal profit

I'm not responsible for poor business models.
b) the effected airline was subsidized by the government (they own most of the stakes)

So what? Even less excuse for not paying.
c) the effected airline's government was a third world nation.

So you would think they should be more concerned about creating jobs for the poor instead of catering to wealthy jet setters.
d) the third world nation paid the search cost (with help from neighboring nation, such as China, Japan, Australia, Vietnam lending ships and airplane).

If you want to play you have to pay.

xponen
not rated yet Jun 25, 2014
How you did not know that most airline are broke???
1) Its not the business model that is responsible. >60% of airline expense is on Fuel.

In early days, (several decade ago) fuel cost is just ~20% of expense. This allow some big profit.
2) Also an airplane costs billion. (Billion is the range of any nation's budgets. You can create soo much jobs with this amount of money!)
3) And maintenance are really paramount, and there also expense on these area. Maintenance team should be paid handsomely for their essential contribution to airplane's safety.

Airplane is not a car. The expenses on them is beyond what you can imagine. Do you think 1 million customer is enough? I think it need 1 billion customer to pay for the airplane (fly on it) before its really worth it.
xponen
not rated yet Jun 25, 2014
@rockwolf1000

I think you are the one who think "the simple"

When you have question about why stuff sound like it could be better (why government help an airline float? why an airline has marginal profit with million of customer?), do not ask here, search somewhere, but most importantly: go see lecture by people from inside the enterprise

(because these people are still old school and really don't have time to post stuff in internet, we have to go hear them talk).