New GPS satellite launched into space

May 17, 2014

A Delta 4 rocket has lifted off from Cape Canaveral carrying a GPS satellite.

The United Launch Alliance rocket that soared into space Friday will place a navigation satellite into the Global Positioning System constellation for the Air Force. This is the sixth such satellite deployed by the Air Force.

The GPS 2F satellites provide enhanced military signals that have greater accuracy and are more resistant to signal jamming. They also have some civilian applications and a longer life expectancy than the previous generation of satellites.

About three hours after launch, the rocket will deliver the satellite directly to the GPS constellation, which is orbiting at an altitude of 11,047 nautical miles.

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