EU proposes complete ban on drift-net fishing

May 14, 2014
Sardines are seen trapped in a fishing net on September 24, 2013 in Quiberon, western France

The European Union said Wednesday it wants a complete ban by 2015 on drift-net fishing, dubbed by environmentalists as 'walls of death' for killing other marine animals, especially dolphins.

Drift-nets, often vast lengths of near-invisible nylon netting floating near the sea surface, have been banned since 2002 for migratory fisheries but the rules are being flouted, the European Commission said.

Accordingly, there should now be a full EU ban on the drift-nets, which the Commission said kill "marine mammals, and sea birds which are mostly protected," a statement said.

"I am convinced that the only way to eradicate this once and for all is to have clear rules which leave no room for interpretation," said EU Fisheries Commissioner Maria Damanaki.

Despite the 2002 restriction, drift-nets have continued to be used for smaller fish such as sardines and anchovies in the Mediterranean and other areas but they are indiscriminate, entangling anything that tries to swim through them.

Explore further: EU parliament rejects ban on bottom-fishing trawlers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EU slaps seafood trade ban on Belize, Cambodia, Guinea

Mar 24, 2014

In its toughest move yet to eradicate illegal fishing, the European Union on Monday blacklisted Belize, Cambodia and Guinea, effectively banning their products from the world's most valuable seafood market.

Recommended for you

Laser scanning accurately 'weighs' trees

2 hours ago

A terrestrial laser scanning technique that allows the structure of vegetation to be 3D-mapped to the millimetre is more accurate in determining the biomass of trees and carbon stocks in forests than current ...

Cameras detect 'extinct' wallabies near Broome

2 hours ago

Yawuru Country Managers have found a spectacled hare wallaby (Lagorchestes conspicillatus) population, a species which for the last decade was feared to be locally extinct at Roebuck Plains, adjacent to Broome.

Study: Volunteering can help save wildlife

22 hours ago

Participation of non-scientists as volunteers in conservation can play a significant role in saving wildlife, finds a new scientific research led by Duke University, USA, in collaboration with Wildlife Conservation ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.