Britain launches $17 million science prize

May 19, 2014

Britain is offering 10 million pounds (almost $17 million) to whoever can solve one of humanity's biggest scientific challenges—once the public has decided what it is.

The Longitude Prize is inspired by a 1714 contest to find a way of pinpointing a ship's location at sea. John Harrison's winning invention, the marine chronometer, revolutionized navigation.

Organizers said Monday the public would vote on which of six challenges the prize should tackle. They include reversing paralysis, overcoming , improving the lives of people with dementia, providing food and for all and ensuring air travel is not environmentally harmful.

The chosen topic will be announced June 25. The , overseen by Astronomer Royal Martin Rees and other scientists, will open for entries in September.

Explore further: Google to award $1.6 mn to four Brazilian NGOs

More information: Online: www.longitudeprize.org/

5 /5 (3 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Google to award $1.6 mn to four Brazilian NGOs

Feb 10, 2014

Google will award $1.6 million in prize money to four non-profit groups submitting winning proposals to help Brazil combat lingering social ills, the company announced Monday.

155 European cities join Bloomberg ideas contest

Feb 19, 2014

Unemployment, energy efficiency and obesity are the top concerns targeted by some 155 European cities competing to out-innovate each other in a lucrative contest launched by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, his foundation ...

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

Apr 23, 2014

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Recommended for you

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

18 hours ago

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

21 hours ago

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

22 hours ago

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

COCO
not rated yet May 20, 2014
how about putting some cash into a real 911 and 7/7 investigation in honour of peace and logic?