Britain launches $17 million science prize

May 19, 2014

Britain is offering 10 million pounds (almost $17 million) to whoever can solve one of humanity's biggest scientific challenges—once the public has decided what it is.

The Longitude Prize is inspired by a 1714 contest to find a way of pinpointing a ship's location at sea. John Harrison's winning invention, the marine chronometer, revolutionized navigation.

Organizers said Monday the public would vote on which of six challenges the prize should tackle. They include reversing paralysis, overcoming , improving the lives of people with dementia, providing food and for all and ensuring air travel is not environmentally harmful.

The chosen topic will be announced June 25. The , overseen by Astronomer Royal Martin Rees and other scientists, will open for entries in September.

Explore further: Group comes close to winning $1M Netflix prize

More information: Online: www.longitudeprize.org/

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COCO
not rated yet May 20, 2014
how about putting some cash into a real 911 and 7/7 investigation in honour of peace and logic?

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