Retailers get creative with Pinterest

April 25, 2014 by Mae Anderson

Target, Nordstrom and other big chains are literally pinning their hopes of attracting shoppers on social media.

Retailers increasingly are using Pinterest, a social media site that allows users to create collections of photos, articles, recipes, videos and other images that are called "pins," to draw business to their own sites.

Popular items on Pinterest are being prominently displayed in Nordstrom stores. Target is creating exclusive party-planning collections with top Pinterest users, or "pinners." And Caribou created a coffee blend that was inspired by the coffee chain's Pinterest fans.

The interest in Pinterest comes as retailers increasingly realize the power of sites to steer business their way. They've found while smartphone-toting Americans are spending time opining and posting photos online, they can be encouraged to spend money, too.

Explore further: Pinterest separates personal, business accounts

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